1940s

Showing all 12 results

  • Brilhart Streamline 5 Alto Saxophone Mouthpiece MPC400

    $ 375

    Beautiful almost new example of a rare Streamline Brilhart Ebolin alto mouthpiece. Stamped 3*, it measures like a Meyer 5 tip at .074″ on the original facing. This is often the case with Brilharts, where you only know the tip by measuring.

    This mouthpiece plays great with a beautiful warmth and fullness that also does not lack projection. Brilharts like this are among my favorite vintage alto mouthpieces (along with Meyer and MC Gregory).

    If you happen to want the rare and collectible original Brilhart BB screws streamline alto ligature and cap, I have one in my collection that fits this mouthpiece that I would be open to selling.

  • Conn 10M Tenor Pre-War Original Lacquer Cleaned and Ready for Pads Very Good Condition Great Deal – just add an overhaul

    $ 3,650

    This is a BEAUTIFUL original lacquer Conn 10M that is totally ready to be overhauled by your favorite saxophone repair shop. Or get it overhauled through GetASax if you prefer. Way back in 2009 I was selling 10M’s this nice for more than this price, also with original pads, and they have gone up a LOT over the past 10 years. I am pricing this one low so that it sells quickly. Check out those photos. Go ahead – zoom in, make them full screen. The larger the image, the better this horn looks. It has had a few small dings removed, and the body side of the brace was carefully resoldered where it had popped off. (This happens sometimes on Conns.) You can hardly tell at all. That’s really about it! This is as clean as a 10M gets, even if you wait around for a year for the best one you can find.

    If you have been looking for a definitely great 10M, look no further. If you want to get this AND get it in with a Conn specialist like Matt Stohrer for overhaul, I am open to giving you one of my precious reserved overhaul spots with Matt. His work on Conns is really outstanding. I don’t make any money on that. You just work out your overhaul options with Matt.

    To give you a taste of what this horn can sound like, here’s a classic recording of Dexter Gordon putting his 10M through its paces. That’s a Hollywood Dukoff from the 40’s if you’re curious. The horn can take a ton of air, and just keep giving you more tone. Dex never sounded better than at this period on the 10M. It’s a natural fit. 

  • Conn 10M Tenor Saxophone 1948 Original Lacquer Old Pads

    $ 2,750
  • Conn 10M Tenor Saxophone Naked Lady Rolled Tone Holes Original Lacquer Good Pads 322571

    $ 2,950

    Great deal on an original lacquer, rolled tone holes Conn 10M tenor. This horn came from a big collection of great American saxophones that I recently bought. It was repadded at some point before it came in, and the pads are still in good condition. It has a huge, warm, medium dark, powerful tone that fills a room instantly. And the intonation is also great. The keywork is quite fast and comfortable once you get used to it, which only takes a couple of weeks if you are coming from a Selmer.

    The only past repairs are some small dents removed from the back of the body tube. Probably from a mouthpiece rattling around in the case with the horn long ago. One in the upper body tube, one near the strap hook, and one near the thumb hook. Also a small one removed from the top of the neck. It’s in very good shape now. It’s uncommon to see a 10M like this with so few repairs and nothing resoldered or seriously damaged and repaired. This is one of the good ones for sure! Engraving is beautiful and crisp also.

    Only one available! Get it now.

    Just for fun, here’s Dexter Gordon putting a 10M from the same era through its paces. (The mouthpiece is a Hollywood Dukoff, which I also have for sale, if you are looking.) The sound mixing guy who recorded Dex always had to dial him back a lot. There really is no limit to the volume on  a Conn 30M tenor.

  • Conn 6M VIII Alto Saxophone 1942 Original Lacquer Pre-war Excellent Condition!

    $ 2,250

    This Conn 6M is the most desirable version, with the VIII stamp on the neck, and the entire saxophone is in excellent condition. It is all original – including neck, pads, original lacquer, and original case. The pads are completely done and you’ll have to overhaul this to play your first note on it. It would be hard to find a better overhaul candidate. Usually there’s at least one resolder, but the only thing I can see that has ever happened to this alto is a small dent removed from the back of the bow which is now nearly invisible.

    The neck is gorgeous, body tube, bow, and bell are all dent free and beautiful. The engraving really pops on this horn, and the lacquer has a luster that you don’t always see. The reason this Conn 6M alto is in such great condition, is that the original owner bought it in early 1942, (just before Conn stopped producing saxophones to start making alitmeters for the war effort), and then he enlisted and went off to war. When he came back, he bought a Conn 10M tenor saxophone  and played that instead. The 10M is in nearly as good condition, though it’s not original lacquer like this alto is.

    Conn 6M altos are amazingly consistent from horn to horn. Just get it properly overhauled, and it will be a really lively, projecting, room-filling lead alto that sails over a band with ease. There’s nothing like a Conn in full song. Plus, as you may know, the keywork layout on the 6M is very comfortable and fast under the fingers. In an alternate universe where Conn kept making saxophones during WWII and Selmer stopped making saxophones to fight the Nazis, Conn’s keywork design would have become what you see on all modern saxophones. It’s that good. I prefer Conns to Selmers on alto, generally speaking, and my favorites are these pre-war 6M’s. They’re just so fun to play. The horn comes alive in your hands, the body tube vibrates in response to the sound, and there really is no limit to the amount of sound you can get out when pushed. People come in the shop and play the Conns, and they are regularly blown away.

    I have some other, very similar altos right now that also come with the full overhaul / restoration included in the price. You can see the selection of Conns available here. There are also some in other finishes like silver plate or even gold plate.

    Just for fun, here’s Marshal Royal and the Basie Band (all of whom used Conns) playing a ballad on his 6M. 

  • Conn 6M VIII Alto Saxophone Pre-War Original Lacquer Very Good Condition Plays Well 294775

    $ 1,950

    This pre-war (from the American perspective, meaning prior to the government order than restricted the manufacture of musical instruments along with anything else made out of brass) Conn 6M was built in 1941, and is the desirable “VIII” version, with the VIII stamp on both the body and neck.  

    It is in very good physical condition with original lacquer, no dents, and no major or minor past repairs or resolders, with the exception of a repaired dent on the bowguard, which is visible in the photos.  It has what appears to be a recent repad, or perhaps an old repad that wasn’t played much after it was done, and Conn Res-o-pads were used. It plays well with a big voice, and although to my professionally-obligated-to-be-picky tastes it is not quite as astoundingly slick under the fingers at these feel when they have been overhauled as the best repairers can do, it is definitely playable as-is and will beat the pants off of most any challenger, especially modern imports that cost a lot more and give you a lot less than this fine example of vintage American saxophone craftsmanship.  

    Oddly, the lacquer on the neck is more worn than the rest of the horn- although physically the neck is in immaculate condition with no dents or past pulldowns.  In the past when I have seen this the culprit is usually a homemade neck bag that was lacquer-unfriendly, or perhaps the owner had a habit during rests to hold the horn with the neck in his hand.  Given the lack of wear elsewhere on the horn, I’d guess a neck bag was the culprit here, although I can’t be certain. But again, though the lacquer itself is mostly gone from the neck (and the neck alone), the neck tube is flawless and there are no signs of past repairs of any kind.  

    The microtuner is free and functional, and all of the original rollers and present and moving freely.  The engraving is crisp and clear with no lacquer loss, and the pearls seems largely unworn. The keywork is tight and the body is straight.  This is a very clean example of the most desirable vintage of the most desirable variant of the Conn 6M, and it can be yours for less than a new Yamaha YAS-26.  

  • King Super 20 Tenor 298061 Series 1a Full Pearls Original Lacquer (mostly gone) Recent Overhaul

    $ 5,450

    This is a 1948 King Super 20 tenor saxophone with ‘full pearls’ on the side keys, G#, octave key, and palm keys, as well as on the rest of the key touches. The pearls, solid silver neck, double socket neck tenon, and fancier engraving mark this out as being the deluxe version of the Super 20 that sells for more and that is highly coveted by players for its beauty and unbeatable tone. This tenor is original lacquer, meaning that it hasn’t been refinished, but the original lacquer was chemically removed from the body tube, and still remains on the keys giving the horn a cool two tone look. It came to me from a pro player on consignment, and it plays well, like you might expect for a horn that had been recently restored. It was overhauled by Ivan Lukyanets in Encino, CA, who has a great reputation among pro players in the LA area. It feels nice and snappy under the fingers, and the black kangaroo skin pads are sealing well. They have flat, medium sized metal resonators that work well on a King and are similar to factory spec for this era.

    This tenor is very clean condition mechanically. I don’t see any past dent work or any resolders or other past repairs at all. The original solid sterling silver neck is also in excellent condition, and has not been damaged or pulled down. It has the matching serial number, as you can see.

    The main reason to get a King Super 20 tenor saxophone is the tone. These late 40’s Super 20 tenors are big and bold and projecting while still being medium dark and very saturated and punchy. If you put on a brighter mouthpiece, like the classic Berg Larsen / King Super 20 pairing, then you get a killing sort of dark/fat/bright/projecting sound that you can’t get on any other saxophone. It’s the reason why there is such a thriving community of King Super 20 players even 70 years after horns like this one were manufactured. It’s my favorite tenor as well, out of everything that I have played.

    If you’re looking for a very good professional tenor to play and enjoy that won’t back down no matter what you throw at it, that will cut through a band with ease, even without amplification, and that has the beauty of the pearls, engraving, and silver neck, then by all means, get this one. I try to keep a good selection of King Super 20 tenors around, so check them out, and email me with any questions. If you want to pair it with a new case, I can get you a great deal on a BAM that will fit it well. Just for fun, here’s a clip of Charlie Ventura playing his ’48 King Super 20 tenor. And I suspect, but cannot prove, that Sonny Rollins played Saxophone Colossus on a Super 20 much like this! 

    Only one available!

     

  • Sold Out

    King Super 20 Tenor Original Lacquer Amazing Condition 297xxx

    This is a 1948 King Super 20 tenor saxophone with ‘full pearls’ on the side keys, G#, octave key, and palm keys, as well as on the rest of the key touches. The pearls, solid silver neck, double socket neck tenon, and fancier engraving mark this out as being the deluxe version of the Super 20 that sells for more and that is highly coveted by players for its beauty and unbeatable tone. This tenor is original lacquer, in uncommonly nice condition. This is one of the best 40’s Super 20’s that I have seen, with beautiful honey gold original lacquer.

    This tenor is very clean condition mechanically. I don’t see any past dent work or any resolders or other past repairs, aside from so very small dents removed from the back of the bow area that are nearly invisible. The original solid sterling silver neck is also in excellent condition, and has not been damaged or pulled down. It has the matching serial number, as you can see, and it even has some of the original gold lacquer remaining on it! This sax was overhauled before I got it, and it plays well on the current overhaul.

    The main reason to get a King Super 20 tenor saxophone is the tone. These late 40’s Super 20 tenors are big and bold and projecting while still being medium dark and very saturated and punchy. If you put on a brighter mouthpiece, like the classic Berg Larsen / King Super 20 pairing, then you get a killing sort of dark/fat/bright/projecting sound that you can’t get on any other saxophone. It’s the reason why there is such a thriving community of King Super 20 players even 70 years after horns like this one were manufactured. It’s my favorite tenor as well, out of everything that I have played.

    If you’re looking for a very good professional tenor to play and enjoy that won’t back down no matter what you throw at it, that will cut through a band with ease, even without amplification, and that has the beauty of the pearls, engraving, and silver neck, then by all means, get this one. I try to keep a good selection of King Super 20 tenors around, so check them out, and email me with any questions. If you want to pair it with a new case, I can get you a great deal on a BAM that will fit it well. Just for fun, here’s a clip of Charlie Ventura playing his ’48 King Super 20 tenor. And I suspect, but cannot prove, that Sonny Rollins played Saxophone Colossus on a Super 20 much like this! 

    Only one available!

     

  • King Super 20 Tenor Original Lacquer Full Pearls Fresh Overhaul!

    $ 6,450

    Price just lowered 6/4/19! This is one of the most beautiful saxophones ever produced – the King Super 20 with pearl side keys and palm keys, bell and bow key cups engraved, solid silver neck, three ring strap hook – just about as de-luxe as it gets.

    But wait, there’s more! For a price lower than a new Keilwerth Shadow, or a new Selmer Reference etc, you get not only one of the best-built, most beautiful, best-sounding tenors ever made. You also get it with a fresh overhaul done by one of the most meticulous saxophone repairmen in the business – Carlo Cennamo of cennamowoodwinds.com . I have been hearing good things about Carlo’s work for a few years, but I finally got to see it earlier this year, and it is just top quality. Full mechanical rebuild including all key fitting to precise better-than-new tolerances; excellent pad work that feels dry and snappy under the fingers and makes the horn resonate its notes on its own as you close the pads; adjustment materials that make sense throughout; a carefully done neck fit for a good seal; nice, even spring tensions. This is a $1500++ overhaul and takes Carlo almost an entire work week to complete. So that’s a big deal.

    The only past repair I see on this horn is a resoldered brace on the bell side that popped off on its own when the horn was disassembled. It was popped right back on and is in good shape now. This horn has obviously been babied since it was new. It has almost all of its original lacquer intact. For you King geeks out there, this is King’s ‘light’ colored lacquer advertised in its sales brochures. The dark lacquer ranges from caramel to chocolate colored and looks completely different.

    This horn just sings, with a medium dark core tone that gets brighter and punchier as you push it. The solid silver neck gives you more upper partials and a bit more of a ringing focus to the sound. The whole horn comes alive as you play, and the response is particularly satisfying. If you have never played a saxophone that is actually right, then I hope that you will soon get to experience it. Low Bb is just another easy note to play, and you can play the entire low register easily at any volume, including pianissimo without losing ‘saturation’ in the sound. Basically, the horn just gets out of the way and lets you play what you want. It’s a beautiful thing.

    This comes with a new BAM Classic tenor case, and you can swap that out for a different case if you want to discuss options. There’s only one available of this beautiful Super 20. Get it now!

  • Martin Committee II Tenor Saxophone Excellent Condition Original Lacquer Overhauled 131115

    $ 3,500

    This is the best Martin Committee II tenor saxophone that I have seen. It is in phenomenal shape and just got a complete mechanical overhaul. It plays SO well – effortlessly throughout all registers with a beautiful, warm, balanced tone. Martins are known for their power, and this one has that, but it is also more focused and round than most other Martins, and has a nice dense core tone. The intonation is very good, and the keywork is also quite comfortable under the fingers. The thumb rest from the Comm II should be on more saxophones. It’s extremely well thought out.

    The overhaul on this horn is beautifully done, as you can see, and included meticulous polishing of all the nickel keys to a stunning mirror finish. The original lacquer is a beautiful dark honey color that is hard to match among modern horns, and of course, the lion and crown engraving is deluxe and distinctive among vintage saxophones. I particularly love the bell key guard design and the overall stylistic impression given by the Martin Committee II tenors.

    If you are looking for a great, already-overhauled, beautifully restored, original lacquer vintage tenor to play and enjoy that really does everything quite well, and that doesn’t sound just like everyone else, then you would be hard pressed to do better than this one. I should mention, the neck and body serials do not match – probably because the collector I got this tenor from wanted to put the best condition neck on this horn.

    Only one available!

  • Otto Link Tone Master 4* Alto Saxophone Mouthpiece MPC469

    $ 300

    Light reface to a 0.062″ tip opening. Mild rollover baffle, large chamber, curved sidewalls. It has a much darker tone than you might normally think of with metal. Very playable. If you want a rich, medium-dark alto tone, and want a mouthpiece that looks cool, and is more durable than hard rubber, this would be a good option. It brightens up when pushed, but is not a bright mouthpiece overall.

  • Selmer Balanced Action Alto 1945 Fresh Overhauled Original Silver Plate Excellent Condition

    $ 5,650

    Get your Paul Desmond tone going with this beautiful, freshly-overhauled, original silver plate Selmer Balanced Action alto saxophone from 1945. This is the sort of alto Desmond played on Take Five, among many other recordings, and it is the sweetest sounding Selmer alto ever made in my opinion. The ‘Balanced Action’ in the name refers to Selmers revolutionary new keywork design that came on this instrument. It probably doesn’t seem revolutionary to you, since every saxophone made today is made in imitation of Selmer’s ‘balanced action’ design!

    The upshot is that you get an alto with a beautiful, warm, lyrical vintage tone, but with keywork that feels quite modern under the fingers. That’s what makes the Balanced Action model such a sweet spot for vintage Selmers. The earlier Selmers are great, but the keywork feels more antequated to many alto players, who, as a general rule, seem less interested in vintage tone unless the keywork also feels more familiar. Tenor players are in general more dedicated to tone, and will work with vintage keywork if it gets them the sound the want.

    Anyway, it would be hard to find a nicer example of a Selmer Balanced action alto saxophone than this one. It has nearly all of its original silver plate intact, and it has no dents or dings, and no resolders. The bell flare, bow, neck, and body tube are clean and undamaged. The neck is particularly nice. This sax also comes with a recent overhaul done by Jack Finucane, and it feels good under the fingers, with everything nice and snappy and sealing well. You won’t have to put money into this one to get it playing well, and it won’t need more than regular maintenance to play well for a nice long time.

    It even includes the BAM case in the photos, so this is really a great deal at this price. Whoever gets this horn is going to be pretty lucky I think. It’s warm and lyrical, medium spread, but with a nice, solid core tone. You can take the sound in lots of directions, from classical (Selmer’s main design idea at the time) to jazz, smooth jazz, west coast, rock, or really whatever. It’s flexible enough to work with a variety of mouthpieces and still tune well. This is a great alternative to buying some boring new horn for several reasons: better overhaul, better tone, much better resale value, better build quality, more beautiful. But mostly for the tone.

    Only one available.