Original Finish

Showing all 52 results

  • Buescher Aristocrat Big B Tenor Original Lacquer Needs Overhaul

    $ 1,600
  • Buescher Big B Alto Saxophone Original Lacquer Good Condition 324407

    $ 1,650

    This is a 1949 Buescher “Big B” Aristocrat, so named for the ornate engraving of a, well, a Big B on the bell.  This horn is in very good condition, and the typical wear around the fine engraving of the B on the bell is not present, which indicates that this horn has led a life mostly in a closet somewhere.  There are no resolders or past dentwork to speak of, and it plays *way* better than it should on some very old pads, but you would want to get this repadded to play like it can, which is very, very good!  

    These horns are undervalued in my opinion.  I mean, you can get this one in such great shape with all of its original Snap-on resonators and overhaul it for not a whole lot more than a Yamaha student model in total- seems like a good buy to me! They combine excellent intonation, comfortable keywork, top notch build quality, and beautiful lacquer and engraving with a warm, centered tone.  Johnny Hodges famously played one of these, and his tone is a very good example of the blend of sweetness and power these horns possess.

  • Buescher Big B Tenor Saxophone 293523 Original Lacquer Fresh Full Overhaul Excellent!

    $ 3,500

    Price JUST reduced mid May 2020! This is an excellent deal!

    This is an original lacquer Buescher Aristocrat Big B tenor with the desirable small bell. It’s one of the most beautiful vintage Bueschers, with extensive engraving and gorgeously translucent, dark nitrocellulose lacquer. They don’t make them like this anymore.

    This tenor just got a full mechanical overhaul, and I mean the works! When I got it, it had new pads, but the pad work was not that good, so now it has a really great overhaul and plays excellently. The keywork is in great condition – nice and tight. The missing lacquer on the back of the bow doesn’t show when you play, and is from a small dent that was removed a bit to vigorously at some point. That is now fixed, and the rest of the horn is quite nice. Neck is in good condition also. There are no dents or dings. It is hard to find this desirable version of the vintage Buescher tenor in good shape, and this one is better than all but a few. It has the snaps and spuds intact, but has correct style ‘real’ pad work that works around the spuds. (If you watch Matt Stohrer’s video on Buescher overhauls, you’ll see what I mean. This is extra work, but worth it to do right the first time.)

    Playing wise, it’s tons of fun. It has a centered, warm tone with excellent response and intonation. It would be pretty hard to sound bad on this tenor. It has that classic American straight-ahead projection that fills a room whether you are amplified or not. And it’s just pleasant to listent to. So many of the modern options I hear people playing are different flavors of bland and rather hollow-sounding. This tenor is rich and full of color. Bueschers like this tune well with a wide range of mouthpieces, and they can do anything from classical to jazz to R&B.

    Only one available.

  • Buescher True Tone C Soprano Rare Original Gold Plate! Old Pads 86473

    $ 2,150
  • Buffet Super Dynaction Alto Saxophone Original Lacquer 17435

    $ 2,350
  • Conn 10M Tenor Saxophone 1940 Pre War Excellent Condition Orig Overhauled!

    $ 4,650

    Fresh overhaul just finished on this beautiful original lacquer Conn 10M tenor saxophone from 1940. This horn is in excellent condition and just got a high end overhaul to put it into absolutely effortless shape. Nothing sounds like a 10M! This is one of the best sounding horns on the site right now, even including my silver Radio Improved tenor!

  • Conn 10M Transitional Tenor Saxophone 1933 Fresh Overhaul Excellent Player

    $ 3,950

    This is a hard to find example of a very late ‘transitional’ Conn New Wonder II / 10M tenor saxophone. It has features of each model – mostly 10M keywork at this point, except for the bell keys still being split between left and right. Original lacquer!

    Just back from a near-overhaul extremely comprehensive setup. It had new pads when I got it in, but a bad overhaul, so we re-overhauled it but reused the pads, which were fine.  We disassembled, cleaned throughout, oiled, took out all the pads, and reseated them with extra adhesive, and replaced many of the tiny adjustment screws that Conns come with. This tenor also got the neck ‘fit’ to the tenon, which makes a big difference, and it got new rollers too, to match the originals. Now, it plays effortlessly, and feels and looks great. The pads are all sealing super well and should be setup for the long haul – unlikely to need more than minor adjustments for a long time! That’s great, because most people have never, I think, actually experienced a vintage saxophone like this when it was totally ‘right’. When it is, you see why these horns have such lasting value and popularity. They’re really just about the best sounding tenors ever. And it’s LOUD too, but without breaking up. The loudest Selmer is only about half as loud as a good Conn like this. And the body tube vibrates in your hands when you push it. It’s just the best.

    You get it for less than these often go for, simply because it has been played a lot and has some keyguard resolders and general lacquer wear. It’s all fixed up though, and should play great for a long time with just minor regular maintenance.

    Those Connoisseurs and Conngnoscenti (sorry, couldn’t resist) out there who know how great the late transitional tenors are can advise you on this one. It has the wideness and ‘wildness’ of a New Wonder II, but a little more focus, a little more slotted intonation, and the faster keywork of a 10M. If you want more focus, and even more slotted in intonation, then get a later 10M. If you want something a bit darker, and more spread, get an earlier NWII. If you want a little of both, get this! These tenors are only going up in value, so it’s also a solid buy as an instrument that will hold its value well when you go to sell it later.

    Only one available!

  • Conn 12M Transitional Art Deco Engraved Original Silver Plate Baritone

    $ 8,000

    Freshly overhauled Mulligan-era original silver plated Art-deco engraved Conn transitional 12M baritone in great shape. This horn just had a high end overhaul, and it feels like a new horn under the fingers. It has the rare art deco engraving, and it looks gorgeous. It has had several posts resoldered, as you can see, which was part of the overhaul, and done to make it really sturdy and ready for its next 80 years of playing. This horn is just effortless to play, and it sounds warm and full and extremely pleasant. Conns almost feel like a tenor to hold and play, weight wise, which makes them extra fun for the pro bari player. Plus nothing sounds like a Conn 12M. This is fully a 12M in terms of keywork and features, with same side bell keys, X brace and 12M stack and palm keys. These are super hard to find in good shape. I’ve been watching beat up 12M’s needing a $2k overhaul selling over $6k on eBay, so this rare art deco version from the best serial range and already overhauled is definitely a great deal. It will only go up in value. This is the baritone to have.

    Only one available!

  • Sold Out

    Conn 6M Alto Original Silver Plate 250314 Recent Repad Big Sound

    $ 3,250

    One of the very earliest 6M’s and my favorite vintage as well. Beautiful original silver plate, recent overhaul, some resoldered posts etc. Email for a full description!

  • Conn Connstellation Alto Saxophone 28M Excellent Condition Original Lacquer 338006

    $ 2,650

    The Conn 28M will always have a special place in my heart.  It represents the last time one of the great American saxophone manufacturing companies tried something wholly new, and although the horn never really found a market and not many were made, they are fantastic instruments that besides being unique and historically interesting, play *really* well.  

    These saxophones were redesigned, utilizing many ideas from Allen Loomis (Conn’s resident saxophone visionary) and Hugh Loney, with input from Santy Runyon, with the aim of creating a saxophone that had extremely slick keywork and a very balanced scale.  The keywork, although familiar under the fingers with regard to placement and layout, is mechanically quite different from any other saxophone and has been built from the ground up with the goal of reducing mechanical friction. There are no pivot screws anywhere on this saxophone, instead the long rods have a very long hinge rod with the middle machined down so only the ends touch.   The G# has a very unique torsion mechanism to provide a G# feel that is smooth throughout the range. The side keys are designed so that the angle and distance of travel is the same for each key. There are adjustment screws on the upper and lower stacks as well as the left hand pinky table. The bell keys are on the left side, and the pants guard/bell keyguard is a large acrylic plate that was designed with the idea in mind of allowing the horn to vent properly regardless of playing position or clothing choice.  The octave mechanism has three pips (octave vents), one on the neck and two on the body, which has the end result of a very clear middle D and no hiss on the A or G#, as well as excellent intonation. The keywork in general is very light, and the pearls are larger than usual for Conn and a little flatter. The overall feeling is of a very light horn, extremely slick, easy to play, excellent intonation, and very even throughout.

    The one downfall of this design is the pants guard, which is fairly brittle and often broken.  Although nowadays there are excellent replacements available, this one has its original guard is about as good condition as they come, fully present with only a few small cracks radiating from around the screw holes, which is common.  However none of the cracks are large and it is not broken in two or missing any pieces, which is not common! And believe it or not, I have experience shipping these so you can rest easy knowing I will remove it for shipping, wrap it separately, and it will arrive to you in good condition.  

    This instrument plays quite well on older pads, with a strong, moderately bright, cheerful voice.  The clarity of the tone is notable, and it is a lot of fun to play with a unique look and feel and timbre that would lend itself easily to classical, big band, or small group jazz.  The lacquer is original and nearly flawless, with no evidence of past repairs or dents or resolders of any kind. It is also a unique and interesting piece of saxophone history, in exceptional condition, and whoever owns this instrument next will have a lot of fun being its steward for the next generation.  

  • Conn Connstellation Alto Saxophone 28M Very Good Condition Original Lacquer 335771

    $ 2,250

    You could be forgiven for thinking that because there are two original lacquer, very good condition Conn 28M “Connstellation” saxophones on my website at the moment that these are somewhat common, but I assure you that is not the case!   I will copy and paste the general statements about the 28M from the other description, with the unique description of this particular instrument’s physical and playing condition at the bottom.

    The Conn 28M will always have a special place in my heart.  It represents the last time one of the great American saxophone manufacturing companies tried something wholly new, and although the horn never really found a market and not many were made, they are fantastic instruments that besides being unique and historically interesting, play *really* well.  

    These saxophones were redesigned, utilizing many ideas from Allen Loomis (Conn’s resident saxophone visionary) and Hugh Loney, with input from Santy Runyon, with the aim of creating a saxophone that had extremely slick keywork and a very balanced scale.  The keywork, although familiar under the fingers with regard to placement and layout, is mechanically quite different from any other saxophone and has been built from the ground up with the goal of reducing mechanical friction. There are no pivot screws anywhere on this saxophone, instead the long rods have a very long hinge rod with the middle machined down so only the ends touch.   The G# has a very unique torsion mechanism to provide a G# feel that is smooth throughout the range. The side keys are designed so that the angle and distance of travel is the same for each key. There are adjustment screws on the upper and lower stacks as well as the left hand pinky table. The bell keys are on the left side, and the pantsguard/bell keyguard is a large acrylic plate that was designed with the idea in mind of allowing the horn to vent properly regardless of playing position or clothing choice.  The octave mechanism has three pips (octave vents), one on the neck and two on the body, which has the end result of a very clear middle D and no hiss on the A or G#, as well as excellent intonation. The keywork in general is very light, and the pearls are larger than usual for Conn and a little flatter. The overall feeling is of a very light horn, extremely slick, easy to play, excellent intonation, and very even throughout.

    The one downfall of this design is the pantsguard, which is fairly brittle and often broken.  Although nowadays there are excellent replacements available, this one has its original guard in decent condition.  There is one repaired crack (visible in the photos) and the common small cracks radiating from some of the screw holes.  I would anticipate, absent any further damage, that this keyguard will last and should not present any problems- although I will furnish you with contact information for obtaining a well made (and somewhat more durable) replacement should you ever need it.  And believe it or not, I have experience shipping these so you can rest easy knowing I will remove it for shipping, wrap it separately, and it will arrive to you in good condition.

    This instrument plays quite decently on what appears to be an older repad with plastic domed resonators, with a strong, moderately bright, cheerful voice.  The clarity of the tone is notable, and it is a lot of fun to play with a unique look and feel and timbre that would lend itself easily to classical, big band, or small group jazz.  The lacquer is original and in good condition with some playing wear and a few stand scratches near the low C#, with no evidence of past repairs or dents or resolders of any kind. It is also a unique and interesting piece of saxophone history, in very good condition, and whoever owns this instrument next will have a lot of fun being its steward for the next generation.  

  • Conn New Wonder 1 C soprano 136795 Excellent Condition Original Silver Plate RARE

    $ 1,650
  • Sold Out

    Conn New Wonder 1 Curved Soprano Excellent Condition Original Silver Plate 118598

    $ 1,350
  • Conn New Wonder II Bb Soprano Saxophone 196145 Silver Plate w/Mods Repadded

    $ 1,950
  • Conn New Wonder II Tenor Original Gold Plate Recent Overhaul 1929 228150

    $ 3,750

    This is a desirable late example of a Conn New Wonder II Tenor Saxophone ‘Chu Berry’ in original gold plate! Gold plated Conns are the hardest to find of all the finishes, and they are the favorites of many players and collectors all over the world. The 11 Karat ‘coin gold’ used on Conns like this is a harder alloy, lighter in color, and is a durable finish that looks gorgeous and takes a long time to tarnish. This horn has some lacquer over the gold to protect it in some places. It would shine up and look more even with the lacquer removed, but it’s on consignment, and I’m not authorized to get that done at the moment. You could have it done for $200 by a repairman and the horn would go up a couple of notches in cosmetic condition. It has been played a lot, as you can see – wear on the touch points, some key guards and posts resoldered from popping off over time. This happens on 80 year old instruments, and its no big deal. There’s nothing major to report repair wise, except that the neck on this horn is from a New Wonder 1 Im’m told. Conn necks aren’t numbered or marked, so it’s not like you can really tell, but the gold is a slightly different look in person. The neck plays great! The NW1 necks sometimes feel a little wider and wilder to play than the NWII’s, and this horn has that wide, room-filling quality to it for sure.

    This gold NWII tenor had a complete high end overhaul in the last couple of years, and it plays great on it! It resonates throughout the whole body tube, and it feels ‘dry’ and snappy under the fingers, like a Conn should when overhauled properly. An overhaul like that costs a lot of money, and you’re getting it nearly for free at this price, so this should be an excellent deal for someone! I mean, for the price of a new ‘name brand’ Chinese horn at Sam Ash, you can get one of the best tenors ever WITH a top shelf overhaul, in actual gold plate.

    Only one available!

  • Conn New Wonder II Tenor Saxophone 1927 Overhauled Original Nickel Plate 203475

    $ 2,850

    Super clean, overhauled example of a Conn New Wonder II Tenor saxophone ‘Chu Berry’ in original nickel plate. Nickel Conns don’t get as much attention these days, but they tend to be excellent players. I think this is partly because the finish is just so tough and durable, that the nickel examples are always original finish. I don’t make any finish/tone claims on the site, but I’ve noticed these to be consistently beasts in the playing department over the years.

    This is a nice later style New Wonder II tenor with the updated palm key design, and it was overhauled by another dealer a couple of years ago. The overhaul is good, but maybe not amazing, so you should plan on spending at least a little on setup to get it feeling how you like. It’s on consignment, so I can’t spend money on it myself. However, it is priced low, and someone will get a great deal on a very clean Conn Chu Berry from the best serial range.

    There are very few past repairs on this. I keep going over and over it, and I don’t see anything at all! Which is remarkable for an 84 year old instrument. Maybe the octave saddle on the neck is resoldered, but I think it may not be. The nickel is so durable that you can’t see a tidy solder repair at all. That’s nice if you are one of those people who wants to play a Conn but doesn’t want to be able to see any repairs. You can get things fixed on this as needed, without leaving a trace, if your repairman knows what he’s doing.

    Only one available!

  • Conn New Wonder II Transitional Alto Saxophone Original Silver 237954

    $ 1,150
  • Couf Superba 1 Alto Original Lacquer Fresh High-End Overhaul Plays Great

    The H. Couf Superba 1 is one of my favorite vintage saxophones. They remain one of the best options for a great sounding alto sax with modern keywork and a rich, interesting tone. Darker and fatter sounding than a Yamaha, with rich, wide upper register, and a full, projecting low register, this alto will do it all. If you are looking for a great all-purpose alto, or even for an ideal smooth jazz or commercial sounding alto, the Couf Superba 1 fits the bill. I just sold one of these to a smooth jazz player who loves the fat sound that stays warm when brightened up with a bright mouthpiece. And he loves the comfort of the keywork. These are among the only saxophones that sound this full and rich and also have modern keywork. (Modern saxophones have, as a rule, moved towards a clearer, rounder, more contained sound, and can’t deal with as much air as a Superba 1 can take.)

    This alto came with its original pads still intact, and it is getting a full mechanical overhaul right now, which means it will be back to like new, or better-than-new condition mechanically, and playing wise. If you’re not used to used saxophone lingo, that means that a highly-skilled woodwind repairman is going to be spending about 30 hours of labor on this horn going over every detail, and replacing everything that can be replaced, (all new pads, corks, felts, mechanical work, setup, play testing, neck fit, full disassembly, cleaning, fresh oil etc.) so that it’s totally rebuilt and ready for its next many years of playing. That’s a big added value for you, because you don’t have to worry about the horn needing more than minor occasional maintenance to play its best for many years to come. It also means that it will play effortlessly, and saturatedly at low volumes, in the low register. Low Bb is just another note, even if you want to play it at pp.

    I have no trouble selling a Couf Superba 1 alto as soon as anyone plays one with the fresh overhaul. It’s really hard to beat, regardless of price. And at this price, it is really hard to beat.

    Only one available!

    We pay the best prices for great saxophones.

     

  • Couf Superba 1 Soprano Saxophone 91912 Excellent Overhauled! Grover Washington

    $ 3,450

    Photos are before overhaul. This rare later Couf Superba 1 soprano with Front F key (only the later ones have that) is the same version Grover Washington Jr. played on most of his most famous recordings. Then he switched to an early SX-90 which I also have at the moment!

    These Couf Superba 1 soprano saxophones were made for Herb Couf by Keilwerth, and they are fully professional instruments of very high quality. This one is in great shape, with just some minor lacquer wear from use. It is currently getting a full overhaul. You can almost never buy a properly overhauled Couf/Keilwerth soprano, because people don’t want to sink the money into a top shelf overhaul. Well, in this case, you do! It’s the best of the best in terms of modern soprano saxophones with a warm, full tone.

    Only Keilwerth maintained the big sound of vintage Conn / King / Buescher sopranos. And Keilwerth improved the intonation and added modern, comfortable keywork and ergonomics to the offering. If you want to have a fat soprano sound with modern keywork and great build quality, then this and the SX-90 are basically your only options.

    Get this one and enjoy the soprano as it can be at its best! The overhaul is absolutely great, with all the little details that take a horn from good to great attended to. It will be ready soon, so go ahead and buy it and reserve it for yourself!

    Only one available!

  • Couf Superba 1 Tenor Saxophone Recent Overhaul 91368 Big Player Original

    $ 3,350
  • Sold Out

    Grafton Alto Saxophone Excellent Original Condition Restored and Playable 10591

    $ 4,750

    Ah, the Grafton “plastic” (actually its acrylic) saxophone.  Famously played by Charlie Parker and David Bowie, crafted by an English company, designed by an Italian, it is, according to sales literature of the time, a “tone poem in ivory and gold”.  

    This particular example has actually been repadded by some enterprising repairer (I say it this way because they are notoriously challenging to work on) and it has been done rather well.  It plays, as you may or may not expect, very much like a saxophone and there is not much in the playing of it to convey that the instrument you are playing is wholly unique, with new methods of manufacture and the completely singular keywork mechanisms that its injection molded acrylic body required.  It is comfortable under the fingers, responsive, weighs about what a normal sax weighs, and plays with a warm, if somewhat uncomplex, tone. It is in fact quite an amazing instrument when taken as a whole, and the experience of playing it leaves me with wonder and respect for the company that made it.  

    These are famously known for being delicate, and not many have survived to this day.  This example is in quite good shape, with the only body repair that I can see being the bell to body brace looks to have been shored up with epoxy where a crack was forming.  There are some small hairline cracks near the tenon receiver, but they are minor and do not appear to be spreading. The finish on the keys is original, and the neck is in very good shape with no evidence of past repair or pulldown.  The keyguard is complete and undamaged, and it comes with its original Dallas case.

     

  • Holton Soprano Saxophone Original Silver Plate Great Deal 17402

    $ 800
  • Ishimori Wood Stone New Vintage Alto Saxophone Brand New WSA-VL with F# Dark Lacquer

    $ 4,500

    Only one available!

    This is the highly sought-after Ishimori Wood Stone ‘New Vintage’ alto saxophone available. The model is WSA-VL with high F#. It has dark, cognac colored lacquer and beautiful hand engraving, the among the most elaborate of any modern saxophone. Effortless player. Hard to emphasize how effortless. Completely effortless low register, low Bb pops out like any other note. Altissimo is easy. Tuning is great. The tone is sort of Selmer-ish but punchier like a King Super 20. But it’s not either of those. It’s its own thing – the New Vintage alto.  Easy to play delicately and softly with plenty of saturation and projection. Action is low, fast, and snappy. Great for jazz, concert, ballads– really anything. I’m impressed! Here’s our first demo video:

  • Ishimori Wood Stone New Vintage Tenor VL with F# NEW Dark Lacquer Tenor Saxophone

    $ 4,700

    See below for some sound samples and an unboxing video.

    Only one available of these highly-desirable Ishimori Wood Stone New Vintage tenor saxophones. This one is in beautiful Dark Lacquer. You can find the unlacquered ‘Antique Finish’ version here.  They are usually back ordered, but I will try my best to keep at least one in stock. Ishimori is Japan’s premiere saxophone repair shop, and Mr. Ishimori has been designing, building, and repairing saxophones for decades.

    These tenors not only sound great, but they stand out from the crowd with their excellent new horn setup done in the Ishimori workshop. The Ishimori New Vintage tenors hold up extremely well over time, and every detail of construction and assembly is optimized for ease of play. The tone on this Ishimori tenor is meant to remind you of a vintage Selmer – to my ear, it plays like a late SBA – not as loud and wide open as some Mark VI’s, but more focused than earlier Selmers also. The neck and the engraving are meant to evoke the Selmer Super Balanced Action, so I suspect that the neck is an SBA bore. The tuning is excellent. This body tube is designed to have the high F# tone hole present, so it tunes well with the high F#, and that’s also just a convenient feature. Lacquer is gorgeous, as is the hand engraving.

    Ishimori New Vintage tenors play so effortlessly, they sell themselves. Every time one comes in the shop, it sells almost immediately. I have one in stock coming next week. Get it now!

    See below for some sound samples on a range of mouthpieces, and an unboxing video.

  • Keilwerth Straight Alto Saxophone Original Black Nickel Plate Super Rare

    $ 4,950
  • Keilwerth SX90 Soprano Saxophone Original Lacquer Good Pads Liebman Era 103943

    $ 2,750

    Just tuned up. Liebman era Keilwerth SX90 soprano. If you love that big, fat, warm, round soprano tone that isn’t thin and reedy like a VI or clear and bright like a Yamaha, then you can’t do better than this Keilwerth. Grover Washington Jr played one like this too. It has a recent overhaul and is ready to go.

  • King SilverSonic Tenor Original Lacquer Overhauled Early Eastlake 430459

    $ 5,450
  • King Soprano Saxophone Gold Plate Fresh Overhaul Amazing! 99847

    $ 3,250

    Just freshly overhauled!! This got a full restoration, so it’s back to like new mechanical condition.This is the vintage soprano you should get!

    This amazing gold plated King soprano saxophone will blow the walls down. It is in excellent condition, with nearly all the original gold plate intact. It has just received a full overhaul and restoration, which is not a small job on a 90 year old instrument. It is now back in like-new playing condition and ready to make music for many many years to come.

    King sopranos are rare, and were only made in low pitch (regular concert pitch). They tune nicely, and have a big, warm, medium-focused tone that is less polite sounding than a Buescher, and really fills a room with ease. This example in gold plate and in such amazingly good condition is extremely rare. The great depression in 1929 spelled the end of most of the saxophone market, and marked the end of most makers building sopranos in any kind of quantities. So it’s not surprising that you don’t see a King soprano later than this serial. This is one of the very last ones made, and the latest serial I have seen. The later the better is my motto on vintage sopranos generally speaking, so getting a late one also in gold plate is really exceptional.

    Only one available!

  • King Super 20 Alto Saxophone Original Lacquer Fresh Overhaul 362420

    $ 4,950
  • King Super 20 Tenor 1948 Original Lacquer Full Pearls Good Pads 298084

    $ 6,250
  • King Super 20 Tenor Saxophone Full Pearls Original Lacquer Overhauled 298321

    $ 7,500

    This is an absolutely BEAUTIFUL example of a King Super 20 Tenor saxophone from 1948. It has all the features that you look for in the best Kings: solid silver, double socket neck; engraving all over; and ‘full’ pearls, meaning pearl key touches on the side keys, G# and the palm keys. I don’t think a better saxophone all-around has ever been produced. That’s why I play Kings myself. Plus this one has a recent top shelf overhaul done in California that feels just great. You want a King to be setup and overhauled by someone who knows Kings, for a player who plays Kings. And that’s what you’re getting here! I actually sold this exact horn a few years ago to a long time customer who is a great tenor player, It was entirely original factory pads when I got it. Untouched and near mint. It is now even better – still amazing cosmetically, but playing its best as well!

    There are no resolders or past repairs on this Super 20, and it has beautiful original lacquer. Tonally, the 1948 Super 20 is a medium bright, powerful, projecting saxophone. It’s relatively darker than the later Super 20’s. They get very bright in the late 50’s and early 60’s. But this one is still quite powerful and focused, while sounding a bit darker and fatter than the later ones. The palm key and altissimo tone stays fat and full on a Super 20, which is one of the best things about it. Selmer tend to thin out in the upper register, but Kings stay quite strong. The low register just pops right out no problem. You can play a saturated ppp low Bb without any trouble.

    You would be hard pressed to find a better example of a King Super 20 for sale anywhere right now! I have a few other serial numbers and versions coming up for sale, but none as nice as this. Whoever grabs it will have a really first rate tenor!

  • Martin Handcraft Searchlight Comm 1 Alto Older Pads Great Deal!

    $ 595
  • NOVA Woodwinds Bronze Low A Baritone Saxophone Brand New Great Deal

    $ 2,400

    Introducing the new NOVA Woodwinds line of instruments. The NOVA Woodwinds line meets a need in the marketplace for a lower-priced Low A Baritone saxophone that is still good quality. People have been asking me for years if I can recommend anything in the sub-$3500 price range for a low A baritone. I have had to scrounge for deals on used Yamaha or Yanagisawa baritones, but if the used baritones need a repad or other repairs, then you’re immediately back in the $4k price range, so it really is hard to get anything decent, let alone new under $2500. That’s where the NOVA baritone shines. For only $2450, you get a NOVA baritone (NOVA means ‘new’ in Latin) that is brand new and plays quite well, and that holds up well over time by all accounts.

    If you are shopping for a baritone saxophone, whether for a school band program, for doubling and taking extra gigs on bari, or just for playing some sick funk lines with your Tower of Power cover band, this horn is worth a look. I have friends who have used this bari in their band programs for years, and it holds up to punishment by middle and high school students quite well. That’s saying a lot!

    Much of the reason it holds up well is that I am spending $400-500 per horn on an extensive amount of setup work. It’s almost an overhaul, because it’s fully disassembled, cleaned, oiled, gets all new corks, which is time-consuming, gets rods straightened, many pads reseated or replaced, the LH pinky table rebuilt, the neck tenon ‘fit’ to the receiver, regulation between keys fixed, and actually several other small things improved. At that point, its a completely different instrument from how it arrives. And it actually plays down to low A well and should continue to do so for a long time with only occasional upkeep needed. As such, it’s a solid school bari, doubler’s bari, or just a fun horn to play around on.

    You could set it up and sell it doing MUCH less work – $50 to get pads sealing and send it out the door, but that would not be the way to build a good reputation for your brand, or to take good care of your customers, over even the short term. I want the NOVA line to stand out as the most reliable baritone saxophone you can get new under $2500. Unfortunately, after I buy the horn, pay for international shipping and spend $450 per horn on repair, there’s very little profit to be made on these. Thankfully, this is not a large part of the overall business here at GetASax.

    Once it’s properly ‘mini-overhauled’, the tone is big, loud, and medium between bright and dark. It tunes well with a variety of mouthpieces. The keywork is pretty comfortable, and works fine for anyone from middle school up through adult. The stacks are actually in line, not offset, meaning the tone holes are all in one long row. That changes the feel of the right hand, as you rotate around farther than you otherwise would on a modern horn. This is NOT a Yanagisawa copy. From neck to bell to keywork, it’s really not similar to a B901. The case is usable, with a hard foam contoured interior, sturdy zipper, decent amount of storage, and wheels that are usable on a smooth surface. The mouthpiece it comes with isn’t great, so see below about cheap but good mouthpieces.

    It comes in this version, which is bronze, and then in the brass version also. The bronze is a slightly darker tone, and gives you the two tone look, where the all brass like this just looks like a typical new saxophone. You won’t go wrong with either one. Both of them include the pictured hard case which has wheels, as well as the other accessories in the photos. I would recommend a Rico Metallite for funk/rock, a Yamaha 5C or Rousseau for an inexpensive beginner baritone mouthpiece for concert band, or there are lots of other options getting listed in the baritone mouthpieces section of the site. 

    These low A baritone saxophones tend to sell quickly, so please let me know if you are wanting to order more than one, so that I can be sure to order them far enough in advance to fill your order quickly.

  • Sale!

    NOVA Woodwinds Lacquered Brass Low A Baritone Saxophone NEW Great Deal!

    $ 2,300 $ 2,150

    Demo model for sale at a good discount!

    Introducing the new NOVA Woodwinds line of instruments. The NOVA Woodwinds line meets a need in the marketplace for a lower-priced Low A Baritone saxophone that is still good quality. People have been asking me for years if I can recommend anything in the sub-$3500 price range for a low A baritone. I have had to scrounge for deals on used Yamaha or Yanagisawa baritones, but if the used baritones need a repad or other repairs, then you’re immediately back in the $4k price range, so it really is hard to get anything decent, let alone new under $2500. That’s where the NOVA baritone shines. For only $2450, you get a NOVA baritone (NOVA means ‘new’ in Latin) that is brand new and plays quite well, and that holds up well over time by all accounts.

    If you are shopping for a baritone saxophone, whether for a school band program, for doubling and taking extra gigs on bari, or just for playing some sick funk lines with your Tower of Power cover band, this horn is worth a look. I have friends who have used this bari in their band programs for years, and it holds up to punishment by middle and high school students quite well. That’s saying a lot!

    Much of the reason it holds up well is that I am spending $400-500 per horn on an extensive amount of setup work. It’s almost an overhaul, because it’s fully disassembled, cleaned, oiled, gets all new corks, which is time-consuming, gets rods straightened, many pads reseated or replaced, the LH pinky table rebuilt, the neck tenon ‘fit’ to the receiver, regulation between keys fixed, and actually several other small things improved. At that point, its a completely different instrument from how it arrives. And it actually plays down to low A well and should continue to do so for a long time with only occasional upkeep needed. As such, it’s a solid school bari, doubler’s bari, or just a fun horn to play around on.

    You could set it up and sell it doing MUCH less work – $50 to get pads sealing and send it out the door, but that would not be the way to build a good reputation for your brand, or to take good care of your customers, over even the short term. I want the NOVA line to stand out as the most reliable baritone saxophone you can get new under $2500. Unfortunately, after I buy the horn, pay for international shipping and spend $450 per horn on repair, there’s very little profit to be made on these. Thankfully, this is not a large part of the overall business here at GetASax.

    Once it’s properly ‘mini-overhauled’, the tone is big, loud, and medium between bright and dark. It tunes well with a variety of mouthpieces. The keywork is pretty comfortable, and works fine for anyone from middle school up through adult. The stacks are actually in line, not offset, meaning the tone holes are all in one long row. That changes the feel of the right hand, as you rotate around farther than you otherwise would on a modern horn. This is NOT a Yanagisawa copy. From neck to bell to keywork, it’s really not similar to a B901. The case is usable, with a hard foam contoured interior, sturdy zipper, decent amount of storage, and wheels that are usable on a smooth surface. The mouthpiece it comes with isn’t great, so see below about cheap but good mouthpieces.

    It comes in this version, which is brass, and then in the bronze version also. The bronze is a slightly darker tone, and gives you the two tone look, where the all brass like this just looks like a typical new saxophone. You won’t go wrong with either one. Both of them include the pictured hard case which has wheels, as well as the other accessories in the photos. I would recommend a Yamaha 5C or Rousseau for an inexpensive beginner baritone mouthpiece for concert band, and the Rico Metalite bari for jazz, or there are lots of other options getting listed in the baritone mouthpieces section of the site. 

    These low A baritone saxophones tend to sell quickly, so please let me know if you are wanting to order more than one, so that I can be sure to order them far enough in advance to fill your order quickly.

  • Powell Silver Eagle SE10 Alto One of 18 Made – all options solid silver +Matt Stohrer Overhau

    $ 12,000

    For your viewing pleasure, this is one of the 18 Powell Silver Eagle saxophones made. Powell conceived of an ambitious project to bring back an American-made saxophone of the highest quality. Inspired by the Super 20 SilverSonic, the Silver Eagle reproduces the bore while adding solid silver soldered tone holes and modern keywork. Powell sadly ended their project after making only 18 saxophones, despite high demand, due to the high cost of production. This horn plays like a good super 20 but a little more evenly, and has been completely overhauled by Matt Stohrer. This is the ultimate collectible among modern saxophones, and it is also a burning player. Asking price is just what these cost new, plus a little extra since it got a $1500 overhaul on top of that! It’s not even inflated for the collectibility value, which is probably not smart of me, but there it is. If you want to discuss all the details of this project, I can put you in touch with the people who built it. These were most definitely a new saxophone bore and neck design, inspired by the best King Super 20 SilverSonic altos, both according to them and according to the folks who bought the tooling and mandrels when the project ended. The keywork is modified from tooling bought from B&S, which accounts for the pinky table that sticks out farther than it would on something like a Yamaha.

    There is most certainly only one available. This one has all the possible factory options, which only a subset of Powell Silver Eagles had – including the solid silver tone holes and even cryo treatment. Of the 18 saxophones built, I know at least a couple of them were brass bell, and some others lacked other of these features. This is one of the ones with everything, which makes it even more collectible. Includes the original accessories, case, and paperwork.

    Just for fun, here’s Matt Stohrer’s repairman’s overview from when he overhauled it.

  • Sold Out

    Selmer Balanced Action Saxophone Fresh Overhaul Original Silver Plate Great Tone

    $ 6,500

    This is an amazing, fully restored Selmer Balanced Action alto. It just got a wonderful high-end overhaul, complete with some spot plating on some keys and along the back of the body tube where the silver had begun to wear. This is one gorgeous alto, with the rare British market two-tone finish, and gold wash bell. The spring tension is on the lighter side, like with most Balanced Actions. If you want stiffer spring tension, we could discuss replacing the springs, but right now, it has a light flute-like feel like these originally had.

    Tonally, If you want an alto that people are going to want to listen to, this is the one. It plays extremely well, with a warm, powerful voice that is effortlessly lyrical and makes you not want to put it down. It has high-end reusable domed brass resonators and sounds very good on them. Keywork is snappy, and ‘dry’ under the fingers, like it should be. This comes with a new BAM Softpack alto case, or you can swap that for a Cabine for +$100. These British market Balanced’s are my favorite finish on vintage Selmers, and they are few and far between.

    There’s only one available!

  • Selmer Mark VI Alto 1966 Original Lacquer Beautiful Condition 137647

    $ 7,000
  • Sold Out

    Selmer Mark VI Alto 1968 160943 Original Lacquer Excellent Condition!

    $ 6,350

    Great deal on a beautiful, original lacquer Selmer Mark VI alto with a recent repad. You don’t need to overhaul this one! It plays well right out of the case. There are minimal past repairs, and this is a very desirable serial number as well. To me, the 160k’s are just about the best value in a Mark VI alto. They are cheaper than the 5 digit serial VI’s by a lot. But they also tune better than most 5 digit altos! They play with the warm, projecting, rich tone of a 140-149k VI, but again, without the premium price. You’re getting all the best VI features, and original lacquer, for the price of a new Reference 54. Which is great because the VI will continue to increase in value while you own and enjoy it. Plus you don’t need to sink an overhaul into this one on top of the purchase price. A good overhaul can be quite expensive. This alto plays with a medium bright, warm, moderately focused tone. It does everything well, which is, of course, why the Mark VI became so popular in the first place. It’s often imitated, but the quality, tone and satisfaction of playing the original hasn’t been matched.

    This is a really nice one, and someone should grab it immediately!

  • Selmer Mark VI Alto Original Lacquer 90199

    $ 7,500
  • Selmer Mark VI Alto Saxophone 1960 88979 Original Lacquer

    $ 8,750

    Here’s a beautiful original lacquer Selmer Mark VI Alto saxophone from 1960, with 5-digit serial 88979. This Mark VI is from one of the most desirable serial ranges of all for a Selmer. The original lacquer is mostly present, and is a dark nitrocellulose, which you mainly see on the 5 digit serial VI’s. It has some wear from use, as you’d expect on a VI that plays great and that got played a moderate amount. The neck has the matching serial number to the body and is in great shape. There are no resolders at all. This horn was well cared for! The bell flare, bell, bow, and neck show no signs of dent work or past repairs. The body tube had at least one very minor dent removed where one of the post feet of the octave key was slightly pushed in. It’s fixed beautifully leaving very little trace. The pads on this alto are old, obviously. Many are probably the original factory pads. So plan on an overhaul soon, if you want to get the full experience. It ‘makes saxophone noises’ now, and it’s clear enough that this has the dark, focused, powerful, tenor-like voice of a typical late 85k-95k serial VI alto. These are great players and deserve to be well cared for!

    If you’re looking for a stand out VI alto to get overhauled and then play like crazy, then you might want to grab this one while you can. Nice 5-digits are getting hard to find, and this one is definitely going to be a superb player when it’s repadded.

    Only one available!

  • Sold Out

    Selmer Mark VI Alto Saxophone 1970 184973 Original Lacquer American Engraved Fresh Overhaul!

    $ 6,000

    This is a sweet deal on a freshly-overhauled original lacquer Selmer Mark VI alto saxophone from 1970 serial 184973. This was a one-owner alto before I got it, and the guy was a pro player in the NYC/NJ area. He took great care of it, and now that it’s freshly overhauled, it is all ready for its second life. If you read around on here, you’ll see that I really love the Mark VI altos from the late 60’s and early 70’s like this. They finally got everything right on the Mark VI alto at this serial, after making incremental changes to the bore, bow length, and neck from 1957-1967 or so. By ’67 the alto hits its stride, and the 1970 is basically the same horn. Because the market is not fully rational, you can get some of the best Selmer Mark VI altos for this sort of price, even with a full overhaul, where some of the earlier serial ones will cost much more. That makes this one a great deal.

    If you have the cash, I think you might as well buy the nicest alto you can, and enjoy playing it. Pro altos are easier to play than student and intermediate ones, and the Mark VI is among the easiest vintage saxophones to play and to own. It’s easy to get worked on, well-built, and stays in adjustment well over time. The keywork design set the standard for all modern saxophones and feels great under the fingers. The tone is gorgeous, and the intonation is good. It’s the one horn that does everything the best on average, which is why it is so popular.

    This particular alto has a tone that is medium between bright and dark, and is a nice, balaced player. Not brash and bold like a 220k VI, and not dark and laser-focused like a 60k VI. It’s flexible, dynamic, and easy to take where you want it to go tonally with the right setup. The intonation is good, and the pads feel nice and snappy under the fingers, as they should on a good overhaul. The neck is in good condition and the neck ‘fit’ is all perfectly sealing in the tenon, which is one of those small but important things to have done on a vintage horn to take it from good to great. Cosmetically, you can see this horn has been played, and has some honest wear throughout. After all, it was lovingly pro-owned for many years, but aside from that, it’s very nice. The only past repairs are a resoldered foot of the low C guard that popped loose as it does on so many VI’s, and a few small dents removed from the back of the bow, which is now dent-free. Neck is beautiful, bell flare is in great shape. Tone holes are all great of course.

    It’s a very good deal on a solid Selmer Mark VI alto. This would be, to me, much preferable to spending $6700 on a new Reference 54 alto, which, unfortunately, will probably need an overhaul on top of the purcahse price in order to play its best. This will go up in value, hold up better to prolonged use, and get you your money back should you ever want to sell it. It comes in the new BAM case in the photos.

    Only one available!

  • Selmer Mark VI Tenor 1964 Original Lacquer 118907 Frank Zappa Band

    $ 12,000

    This is a sax with two descriptions! The first is the personal history of the horn, as written by its owner, Robert Martin. Robert is a great guy whose illustrious career as a sax player and multi-instrumentalist is also described a bit.

    Robert’s description of the horn can be found here. 

    The second description is mine as a saxophone dealer who pays attention to the details of condition, and compares saxophones to each other. From that perspective, what we have here is a very nice, one-owner example of a Selmer Mark VI tenor from 1964 with original lacquer, that has been played a lot and well cared-for over the years. It was assembled and engraved in the USA, so it sports what Selmer people call “American engraving”, and it has the dark honey colored nitrocellulose lacquer that is typical of this vintage of Mark VI. The tone is really beautiful on this tenor. I love the early 60’s VI’s, and this is one of the best ones I’ve played. It’s medium dark, medium focused, with lots of power. It’s a lot like a late 5 digit in that way, but has a little bit brighter tone. It’s nothing like a 140k or later VI, where they get quite bright and lose the darker, more focused core of a horn like this. It’s a superb player.

    Cosmetically, it’s obviously been played a fair amount, so it has some honest wear to the lacquer throughout. The neck has seen some minor flexing over the years, but only about a 1-2 on a scale of 1-10 of severity. It is still the correct angle also. The neck has the matching serial number to the body.

    A dent was removed from the upper body tube near high F, and the top post there also got pushed back into alignment. The back of the bow and bottom bow have seen dents removed, and the bottom bow guard is still a little flat. The low Eb, C and chromatic F# keyguards have been resoldered, though done quite well with little evidence left of the repairs. The bell flare also had a minor crease removed at some point. All in all, these are the typical sorts of repairs that you see on a good horn that has been played a lot. Everything is nice and tidy and fixed up now, so I wouldn’t be particularly concerned about the repairs.

    The overhaul on this horn feels great. It was done extremely well somewhere on the west coast, with medium firm leather pads sealed with red paint. Those sorts of pads last forever and keep their feel. I’ve played 25+ year old overhauls on similar pads that are still going strong. Resonators are slightly domed and correct for the vintage of horn. The pad work feels great – dry, snappy, and correctly balanced. You won’t be disappointed!

    If you’re looking for an original lacquer VI tenor with a beautiful tone, a great overhaul, and an interesting history, this would be the one to get.

    Only one available!

  • Selmer Radio Improved Tenor Original Silver Overhauled Excellent

    $ 9,500
  • Selmer Super Action 80 Series II Alto Saxophone 517537 SA80-II Excellent Condition Great Price!

    $ 3,150

    Save thousands of dollars getting this beautiful condition used Selmer Series II alto. This instrument has very little wear, and comes to you in excellent condition. It just got several new pads and a thorough setup, so it is playing very well and effortlessly throughout. As I’m sure you know, the Series II is the standard, go-to alto saxophone for serious saxophone study. You never need to upgrade it, and you can take it to college for saxophone study and it will be in good company there with a lot of other Series II’s and III’s. The tone is balanced, warm, clear and round, with a lyrical core tone and very good intonation. The Series II likes to have a classical style or concert mouthpiece like a Selmer S80 C* or D, or a Selmer Concept etc. Lots of other mouthpieces work, but if you’re not sure what to get, then get one of those two.

    Saxophones don’t really wear out if you maintain them, so there’s really no reason not to save a few thousand dollars on a nice used example of one of the most popular professional alto saxophones. You can keep this for the rest of your life and play it. It will hold its value as long as you own it. These are only going to go up in price over time.

  • Selmer Super Balanced Action Tenor Saxophone 55024 Original Lacquer Fresh Overhaul

    $ 15,950

    This is a beautiful, original lacquer Selmer Super Balanced Action tenor saxophone in excellent condition. Selmer SBA tenors have gotten really hard to find in the last year or two, and this is among the nicest I have seen in that time. It is priced very reasonably for what you get, based on all the other ones I have seen for sale recently. This is a late SBA with the more comfortable thumb hook that is a transitional feature shared by the early Mark VI tenor that came out around the same time that this horn was made. (Selmers often show a little overlap between models, and frequently have transitional features shared by overlapping models.)

    The ‘late’ Selmer SBA tenors like this have gotten particularly hard to find, because they combine the warmer, more delicate SBA tone with the best bell key tuning. This one tunes great, and is quite free blowing, warm, and moderately focused, with a lyrical core tone. Tone is tricky to describe, and obviously the horn sounds completely different depending upon which mouthpiece you use etc. But it plays just how I would hope a great Super Balanced Action tenor would play. You may notice, this has the ‘euro’ engraving style done on Selmer Super Balanced Action tenors that were lacquered and engraved in France.

    The overhaul is recently done in California by Manny Gavrilov at the Horn Connection. Manny’s work feels quite good, with a dry, snappy pad feel. Spring tension is just right. The horn resonates beautifully, and the pads are sealed (hence the red color) to protect against moisture and to make the overhaul last forever. I’ve played horns with red sealed pads that had 25 year old overhauls that were still going strong. It really does a good job of sealing the horn up like a drum, and it just feels like normal medium firm leather pads. The resonators are domed metal and are correct style for a late SBA like this. They look like Selmer Tone-x resonators, and are probably the original resos reused on the new pads. This horn has been played and loved, so it’s not mint condition, obviously. But the wear is ‘honest’ wear from use, not from a bunch of past repairs. I see nothing resoldered at all, and maybe some minor bow dents were removed a long time ago, leaving only very slight evidence of anything having been done. You’ve got a custom octave key thumb rest cover installed, but it’s easily removable, and the original octave thumb rest is under there and looks fine.

    This comes with its beautiful original tan leather Chesterfield case from Selmer with the latch style opening, which is more durable than the zippered Chesterfield. I like the way the leather binding forms one continuous circuit around the case exterior. Just the case is worth some $$! If you have any questions, feel free to ask. I’m happy to help. If you’ve been looking for a great vintage Selmer with some warmth, power and projection, that is in top playing condition, original lacquer and priced reasonably for an original SBA, then here you go. This one is hard to beat.

    Pair with our new GS SLANT tenor mouthpiece for a classic mainstream jazz tone.

    Only one available!

  • SML Gold Medal 1 Tenor 18835 Plays Great!

    $ 3,350

    This SML Gold Medal 1 tenor is in on consignment! It has a big, powerful, dark tone!

    If you’ve played an SML before, this is a classic example – sort of like a Selmer and Conn hybrid. Focused, lyrical core like a Selmer, but big, wide, fat sound like a Conn. Neck angle higher than average for tenor. Plays easy altissimo.
    In terms of condition – the lacquer obviously has quite a bit of wear from use. The neck is in nice shape with no past damage evident. Rolled tone holes look great. There are no dents or dings, but there has been dent work in the bow area, back of the bow, and bow guard. Crease removed from bell flare approx 3 o’clock to 6 o’clock if you’re looking with the horn upright.  Looks like the low C and Eb keyguards have one foot resoldered each. Maybe a little dent work in the upper body tube, like around the D palm key foot and maybe near the neck receiver, but if so, it was done really well. I’m just going from the way the lacquer looks there. The tube is nice and smooth. There are no dents or dings at all! SML’s are really hard to beat in the quality per dollar department. And they are only getting more popular as people find out about their unique tone and combination of premium features.
    Only one available!
  • SML Super 46 Tenor Rare! Original Silver Plate Overhauled Good Condition

    $ 4,750
  • Tenor Madness Custom 500SL Tenor Saxophone Cognac Lacquer High F# Effortless Player Newest Model L01110

    $ 4,500

    This is the best TM Custom tenor that I have played so far. It is brand new, plus it got a new horn setup on top of that. This is the new light body tube version of the 500SL model, and it is a truly effortless player. The intonation is excellent throughout. This bore is designed to have the F# tone hole present, so the tuning is excellent and altissimo is easy including the handy high F# key. The low notes are nice and saturated even at pp, and the horn will shake in your hands if you push it to ff. The palm key tone stays more full and rich than on most Taiwanese tenors that I have played (like P Mauriat etc.). The neck on this tenor is modeled on an early Mark VI tenor neck, and you do in fact get a Selmer-ish tone on it. I am impressed that you can get a horn this good for this price that has been thoroughly setup in the USA by TenorMadness pre-sale.

    The hand engraving is inspired by 50’s Selmer engraving, and it is of course gorgeous. The lacquer color is as well. This is one of the best looking tenors on the market today for sure. It comes in a contoured case that should be good for shipping and gigging.

    If you’re looking for an easy, turn-key purchase for a high-quality modern horn that is darker and more complex than some other new horns on the market, and that is really dependably easy to play, this would be a great choice. Really no matter what style of music you play, this horn gets the job done.

    Only one available!

  • Sold Out

    Yamaha YAS-875EXB Alto Saxophone Black Lacquer Plays Great! C86433

    $ 3,350

    This beautiful Yamaha Custom EX alto just got a thorough tune up including disassembly, cleaning, oil, and a bunch of new pads, and now it’s looking and playing its best! You seldom see Yamaha 875EX altos in special ordered black lacquer, but you should. It’s one of Yamaha’s most beautiful finishes. The ‘honest’ two tone look from the engraving cuts through the black lacquer is striking and gorgeous.

    The main reason to buy a YAS-875EX is, of course, the tone and ease of playing that it offers. No other modern alto tunes as precisely or is so effortless to play in ensemble work. It’s almost like autopilot for sax. If you’ve been struggling to hold pitch on a cheap beginner or intermediate horn for years, you may be startled to find that your habits of correcting pitch are now entirely unnecessary. It just plays in tune. I’m dwelling on that, I know, but both on the alto and soprano EX models, that’s the most striking thing. The tone itself is medium between bright and dark. Brighter than the original Custom 875 model, which I also have available at the moment. The EX darkens down with a classical mouthpiece, or brightens up with a higher baffle, smaller chamber mouthpiece. The tone is not very complex, but is round and clear and projects easily. If you want to play concert, classical, or projecting commercial music, the crisp, clear tone is ideal for working with. If you’re playing smoky jazz ballads, you’ll need an interesting sounding mouthpiece to warm up the sound a bit, or just get a Conn 🙂

    Only one available! This is a great deal on an effortless and beautiful Yamaha Custom alto!

  • Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone

    Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone

    $ 799

    The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone is coming back in stock very soon! Buy your Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone now to reserve it for when the shipment comes in, and support a small saxophone shop at the same time!

    The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone is a new kind of digital saxophone. It is more like a real saxophone than any digital saxophone that has come before, because it has regular saxophone keywork. So unlike an EWI 4000S, 5000, or a WX5, you don’t have to switch to a different keywork feel in order to play the digital saxophone anymore.

    This is going to be huge for people who want to practice saxophone quietly rather than people who just want a midi or digital interface sax. You can practice with headphones on and not bother your neighbors at all hours. Or play it quietly one one of the 15 volume settings. The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone also works fine as a digital input into whatever sound processing software that you want to use. But it feels like a regular saxophone under the fingers. I’ve been having fun with digital saxophones ever since the Casio DH-100, and I think like the Casio, this Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone will probably become an instant classic of its genre for the same reason – it feels more like an actual saxophone to play than any similar option.

    In brief (more below) are the main features of the Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone that you might care about:

    1. The Yamaha Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone has a speaker in the brass bell, so that the sound you generate vibrates the instrument’s body tube. As you play louder, you feel more resonance.
    2. The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone has a regular saxophone mouthpiece (basically a repurposed Yamaha 4C soprano piece) and even a ‘reed’ so that it feels like a saxophone in your mouth also. You can even swap out the Yamaha mouthpiece for your own mouthpiece, as long as it has a similar bore to a 4C, though this won’t do much to the tone if anything. It might make it feel a little more like ‘home’ to you.
    3. The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone has an advanced breath sensor that responds instantly to small changes in breath support by changing the tone that you generate. Again, you see the theme – feels more like a saxophone to play.
    4. The sound it generates is actual sound samples taken from real Yamaha saxophones. You can switch among Yamaha soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone tones on your Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone. Just like with a Line 6 Variax guitar, you’re getting ‘real’ acoustic instrument tone that is controlled digitally. It’s a pretty good idea, thought it still sounds a bit midi to me.
    5. There’s an app that lets you further modify and control the tone you get from the Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone. It remains to be seen how useful this is, but even if it’s junk, you can still input the sound from your Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone into Ableton or Garageband or ProTools or whatever you like and modify it there, or even run the output into analog or digital pedals, like in our saxophone looping video here.
    6. Interestingly it’s keyed from high F# down to low A so you can use it as a baritone model! And the tuning is adjustable within 5 hz so you can play with a flat piano or in different temperatures with acoustic instruments whose tuning changes with changing weather etc. Not a bad idea!

    I’ll put more Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone details and some review videos and sound clips in the long description below, so scroll down for the additional info! And for only $799, it’s not bad even just as a tool to get some late night practice time in.

  • Yamaha YSS-62 Soprano Very Good Condition Getting Overhaul Now

    $ 3,500

    The most iconic and desirable modern soprano model, plus a fresh top shelf overhaul to make it play its best. All of these 62 purple logo Yamaha sopranos are around 35-40 years old at this point, which means it’s time they had new pads and a good overhaul. That’s what this one is getting right now!

    If you want a soprano saxophone that plays effortlessly with a warm, medium bright tone with some complexity to it, that’s what the Yamaha 62 does so well. Plus it tunes easily, and it sounds great with a wide range of mouthpieces. You can waste a lot of time and money trying to find a cheap soprano that is playable. I have dealt with many people who have tried. The Yamaha 475 is the best of the bunch in the cheap-but-good soprano category. But, rather unsurprisingly, it is actually built with the 62 soprano tooling, meaning it’s basically a modern remake of the 62 without a few more expensive options. And the Yamaha 82 soprano line is ALSO a remake of the 62, with slightly modified keywork (tilting low Bb). So you see how influential the original design has been. It’s hard to beat.

    Only one available!

  • YSS82ZRSSopranoStockPhotos-3

    Yamaha YSS-82ZRS Soprano Saxophone One Piece Bent Neck Silver Plate! BRAND NEW

    $ 4,750

    Available new by special order anytime. Email me at [email protected] to order. The Yamaha YSS-62R and 62RS are the most desirable vintage sopranos pretty much. Yamaha made an upgraded reissue of this soprano, with improved keywork but the same bore. It’s simply the best.