1950s

Showing all 16 results

  • Brilhart Streamline 5 Alto Saxophone Mouthpiece MPC400

    $ 375

    Beautiful almost new example of a rare Streamline Brilhart Ebolin alto mouthpiece. Stamped 3*, it measures like a Meyer 5 tip at .074″ on the original facing. This is often the case with Brilharts, where you only know the tip by measuring.

    This mouthpiece plays great with a beautiful warmth and fullness that also does not lack projection. Brilharts like this are among my favorite vintage alto mouthpieces (along with Meyer and MC Gregory).

    If you happen to want the rare and collectible original Brilhart BB screws streamline alto ligature and cap, I have one in my collection that fits this mouthpiece that I would be open to selling.

  • Buescher Top Hat and Cane Alto Saxophone Super 400 Excellent Condition 317532

    $ 2,750

    Beautiful original lacquer, original pads Buescher Super 400 alto ‘Top Hat & Cane’ model. This is the most deluxe saxophone that Buescher produced, with deluxe engraving, fast keywork, and Buescher’s signature top quality intonation. Don’t miss the little details that take these horns from good to great, like the silver “tone ring” under the bell lip, the underslung octave key, and the raised Buescher logo in the engraving. If you have been looking for an alto that has the sweet, dynamic, moderately-focused Buescher tone, and that looks beautiful, and is in uncommonly good original condition, look no further.

    This alto has no resolders, no dents, and only light play wear on the original lacquer. It has the original case in good condition. The neck is in very good condition. Even on the original pads, this alto still plays surprisingly well. It has the snaps and spuds intact, as well as the gold plated Norton  springs. Everything you look for in a top quality Buescher is here. Just get the pads replaced by the repair shop of your choice, and you will have an alto that sounds bigger, sweeter, and more complex than any of the modern alto options, that tunes excellently, and that looks gorgeous. These are built extremely well, and they stay in adjustment very well down the road. The Buescher Top Hat and Cane altos are the creme de la creme of Buescher altos, and they are quite hard to find in this sort of condition.

    Only one available, and priced quite low to sell quickly. I also have the matching tenor, already overhauled, if you are interested in a matched set.

  • Buescher Top Hat and Cane Tenor Saxophone Fresh Overhaul Factory Relacquer 300849

    $ 3,300

    This highly-desirable Buescher Top Hat and Cane tenor is in excellent condition, AND it just got a complete restoration, which means an overhaul of everything that can be done. That’s like a $1000-1500 value added right there.

    This looks like original lacquer, but is actually a factory relacquer job done with basically no buffing or changes to the brass of the horn. Probably just a chemical strip, hand polish, and re-spray. It looks really good, and plays great too!

    The Top Hat and Cane is easily the most desirable of the Bueschers, and it is one of the most beautiful vintage saxophones also, with the raised metal Buescher logo, the castle engraving, and all of the little design touches that set it apart. I personally love the silver ‘tone ring’ underneath the bell flare. A lot of work to add; not very visible, but they did it anyway. And there are details like that all over the horn.

    This is a great all-purpose tenor. It is warm and full sounding – nice fat upper register, responsive low register. Intonation is very easy. And it works with a wide range of mouthpieces. A lot of those beach band 60’s tenor solos are on Bueschers like this, but you can just as easily play jazz or classical repertoire on them. You’re saving about $1500 off the price because it has a new coat of lacquer. That’s a great deal.

    Only one available!

  • Conn 6M Naked Lady Alto Saxophone Original Lacquer 1953 356523

    $ 1,100

    1953 Conn 6M alto original lacquer with old pads. The later 6M’s like this are an excellent value, because they are still well made, but the price is almost laughably low for what you get. I always recommend the 1948-55 or so Conns to people who want a great tone but  who are on a tighter budget. The tone is fantastic – big, wide, with plenty of projection. Intonation is very good, and the keywork is comfortable. There is not a lot to tell condition wise. This horn is in great shape. Original lacquer, neck is in great shape. It looks like there was a small dent removed from the back of the bow, and maybe from behind the lower thumb hook. I hope that I’m in as good shape at 65 years old!

  • Conn Connstellation Alto Saxophone 28M Excellent Condition Original Lacquer 338006

    $ 2,750

    The Conn 28M will always have a special place in my heart.  It represents the last time one of the great American saxophone manufacturing companies tried something wholly new, and although the horn never really found a market and not many were made, they are fantastic instruments that besides being unique and historically interesting, play *really* well.  

    These saxophones were redesigned, utilizing many ideas from Allen Loomis (Conn’s resident saxophone visionary) and Hugh Loney, with input from Santy Runyon, with the aim of creating a saxophone that had extremely slick keywork and a very balanced scale.  The keywork, although familiar under the fingers with regard to placement and layout, is mechanically quite different from any other saxophone and has been built from the ground up with the goal of reducing mechanical friction. There are no pivot screws anywhere on this saxophone, instead the long rods have a very long hinge rod with the middle machined down so only the ends touch.   The G# has a very unique torsion mechanism to provide a G# feel that is smooth throughout the range. The side keys are designed so that the angle and distance of travel is the same for each key. There are adjustment screws on the upper and lower stacks as well as the left hand pinky table. The bell keys are on the left side, and the pants guard/bell keyguard is a large acrylic plate that was designed with the idea in mind of allowing the horn to vent properly regardless of playing position or clothing choice.  The octave mechanism has three pips (octave vents), one on the neck and two on the body, which has the end result of a very clear middle D and no hiss on the A or G#, as well as excellent intonation. The keywork in general is very light, and the pearls are larger than usual for Conn and a little flatter. The overall feeling is of a very light horn, extremely slick, easy to play, excellent intonation, and very even throughout.

    The one downfall of this design is the pants guard, which is fairly brittle and often broken.  Although nowadays there are excellent replacements available, this one has its original guard is about as good condition as they come, fully present with only a few small cracks radiating from around the screw holes, which is common.  However none of the cracks are large and it is not broken in two or missing any pieces, which is not common! And believe it or not, I have experience shipping these so you can rest easy knowing I will remove it for shipping, wrap it separately, and it will arrive to you in good condition.  

    This instrument plays quite well on older pads, with a strong, moderately bright, cheerful voice.  The clarity of the tone is notable, and it is a lot of fun to play with a unique look and feel and timbre that would lend itself easily to classical, big band, or small group jazz.  The lacquer is original and nearly flawless, with no evidence of past repairs or dents or resolders of any kind. It is also a unique and interesting piece of saxophone history, in exceptional condition, and whoever owns this instrument next will have a lot of fun being its steward for the next generation.  

  • Conn Connstellation Alto Saxophone 28M Very Good Condition Original Lacquer 335771

    $ 2,350

    You could be forgiven for thinking that because there are two original lacquer, very good condition Conn 28M “Connstellation” saxophones on my website at the moment that these are somewhat common, but I assure you that is not the case!   I will copy and paste the general statements about the 28M from the other description, with the unique description of this particular instrument’s physical and playing condition at the bottom.

    The Conn 28M will always have a special place in my heart.  It represents the last time one of the great American saxophone manufacturing companies tried something wholly new, and although the horn never really found a market and not many were made, they are fantastic instruments that besides being unique and historically interesting, play *really* well.  

    These saxophones were redesigned, utilizing many ideas from Allen Loomis (Conn’s resident saxophone visionary) and Hugh Loney, with input from Santy Runyon, with the aim of creating a saxophone that had extremely slick keywork and a very balanced scale.  The keywork, although familiar under the fingers with regard to placement and layout, is mechanically quite different from any other saxophone and has been built from the ground up with the goal of reducing mechanical friction. There are no pivot screws anywhere on this saxophone, instead the long rods have a very long hinge rod with the middle machined down so only the ends touch.   The G# has a very unique torsion mechanism to provide a G# feel that is smooth throughout the range. The side keys are designed so that the angle and distance of travel is the same for each key. There are adjustment screws on the upper and lower stacks as well as the left hand pinky table. The bell keys are on the left side, and the pantsguard/bell keyguard is a large acrylic plate that was designed with the idea in mind of allowing the horn to vent properly regardless of playing position or clothing choice.  The octave mechanism has three pips (octave vents), one on the neck and two on the body, which has the end result of a very clear middle D and no hiss on the A or G#, as well as excellent intonation. The keywork in general is very light, and the pearls are larger than usual for Conn and a little flatter. The overall feeling is of a very light horn, extremely slick, easy to play, excellent intonation, and very even throughout.

    The one downfall of this design is the pantsguard, which is fairly brittle and often broken.  Although nowadays there are excellent replacements available, this one has its original guard in decent condition.  There is one repaired crack (visible in the photos) and the common small cracks radiating from some of the screw holes.  I would anticipate, absent any further damage, that this keyguard will last and should not present any problems- although I will furnish you with contact information for obtaining a well made (and somewhat more durable) replacement should you ever need it.  And believe it or not, I have experience shipping these so you can rest easy knowing I will remove it for shipping, wrap it separately, and it will arrive to you in good condition.

    This instrument plays quite decently on what appears to be an older repad with plastic domed resonators, with a strong, moderately bright, cheerful voice.  The clarity of the tone is notable, and it is a lot of fun to play with a unique look and feel and timbre that would lend itself easily to classical, big band, or small group jazz.  The lacquer is original and in good condition with some playing wear and a few stand scratches near the low C#, with no evidence of past repairs or dents or resolders of any kind. It is also a unique and interesting piece of saxophone history, in very good condition, and whoever owns this instrument next will have a lot of fun being its steward for the next generation.  

  • Grafton Alto Saxophone Excellent Original Condition Restored and Playable 10591

    $ 4,750

    Ah, the Grafton “plastic” (actually its acrylic) saxophone.  Famously played by Charlie Parker and David Bowie, crafted by an English company, designed by an Italian, it is, according to sales literature of the time, a “tone poem in ivory and gold”.  

    This particular example has actually been repadded by some enterprising repairer (I say it this way because they are notoriously challenging to work on) and it has been done rather well.  It plays, as you may or may not expect, very much like a saxophone and there is not much in the playing of it to convey that the instrument you are playing is wholly unique, with new methods of manufacture and the completely singular keywork mechanisms that its injection molded acrylic body required.  It is comfortable under the fingers, responsive, weighs about what a normal sax weighs, and plays with a warm, if somewhat uncomplex, tone. It is in fact quite an amazing instrument when taken as a whole, and the experience of playing it leaves me with wonder and respect for the company that made it.  

    These are famously known for being delicate, and not many have survived to this day.  This example is in quite good shape, with the only body repair that I can see being the bell to body brace looks to have been shored up with epoxy where a crack was forming.  There are some small hairline cracks near the tenon receiver, but they are minor and do not appear to be spreading. The finish on the keys is original, and the neck is in very good shape with no evidence of past repair or pulldown.  The keyguard is complete and undamaged, and it comes with its original Dallas case.

     

  • King SilverSonic Tenor Saxophone Exceptionally Fine Player Overhauled 402584

    $ 5,750

    Here is a freshly overhauled King Super 20 SilverSonic (solid sterling neck and bell with gold inlay engraving) in excellent shape with a *monstrous* sound.  The overhaul is extremely clean and well done, and sports high-end reusable Tenor Madness resonators. The action is quick and light and smooth and feels absolutely fantastic under the fingers.  Even the left hand pinky table, which can be challenging for some repairers to get right, is light and snappy as it was designed to be. Seriously, hand this horn to the guy next to you on the bandstand just to let him feel it for a sec if you want to ruin his day.  

    Physically, this sax is in great condition as well.   The lacquer is original and has signs of honest wear, but there are no signs of any major or even minor damage or resolders, past or present.  The body is straight and the keys are all tight with no lost motion. Owner’s name lightly engraved on bottom of bell. Could be removed if you wanted to, but it is not noticeable. SilverSonics like this with the gold in the engraving on the silver bell are few and far between, and this one is bona fide Great. 

    It is hard to find a Super 20 SilverSonic tenor in good physical shape, and even harder to get one overhauled this well.  Buy this horn and you’ve got it all right out of the box- no worries, no mystery, no gremlins awaiting you down the line. Just a great American-made sax that is ready to make bandmates jealous, project all the way to the back of the room, and look great doing it.  

  • King Super 20 Alto Saxophone 1950 Full Pearls 308k Original Lacquer Fresh Matt Stohrer Overhaul!

    $ 6,000

    King altos are the best altos ever. This one has beautiful original lacquer and looks great, with the only past repair being a resoldered key guard foot. It just got a full, fresh, high-end overhaul, done by Matt Stohrer. This means it got about 30 hours of highly-skilled labor done to make the mechanism all factory fresh, and to replace everything that can be replaced so that it is back to new playing condition and pad wise. Matt is something of an authority on vintage King repair You can watch his repairman’s overview of King Super 20 saxophones here. I’m tempted to wax eloquent about what a proper overhaul includes, but think of it like rebuilding an engine or replacing a transmission, and you’ll have the right idea. It now performs great and will be ready to go for many many years to come with only regular maintenance needed.

    This King Super 20 alto is from just about the most desirable year, 1950, which is the same version of Super 20 that Cannonball Adderley played on Kind of Blue and Somethin’ Else. It is in great shape, with no serious past repairs at all.  This is the ‘Series II’ which has the best combination of beauty, features, and key work of all of the Super 20 altos. You really can get the Cannonball Adderley vibe going on one of these (with lots of practice) better than almost anything else. Cannonball played almost exactly this serial alto on Kind of Blue. This plus a Meyer 5 or Ted Klum NY Model plus a soft reed and lots of guts is what you need for what I consider to be the benchmark for good alto sound.

    Why do I say that Super 20’s like this are the best altos ever? The overall combination of tone, beauty, and ergonomics. For me, great tone that you get from these full pearls Super 20’s is pretty hard to beat. It’s warm, full, rich, and projecting, but without any hint of shrillness or thinness. Cannonball’s tone, I always think of as a tenor saxophone reincarnated in the body of an alto, and that’s pretty much what a Super 20 alto like this is. It feels like the tone is coming from a bigger, deeper instrument, but in the alto register, which is really remarkable.

    Just for fun, here’s Cannonball on his Series II Super 20 playing one of his classic ballads, Dancin’ in the Dark.

  • Sold Out

    King Super 20 Tenor Original Lacquer Amazing Condition 297xxx

    This is a 1948 King Super 20 tenor saxophone with ‘full pearls’ on the side keys, G#, octave key, and palm keys, as well as on the rest of the key touches. The pearls, solid silver neck, double socket neck tenon, and fancier engraving mark this out as being the deluxe version of the Super 20 that sells for more and that is highly coveted by players for its beauty and unbeatable tone. This tenor is original lacquer, in uncommonly nice condition. This is one of the best 40’s Super 20’s that I have seen, with beautiful honey gold original lacquer.

    This tenor is very clean condition mechanically. I don’t see any past dent work or any resolders or other past repairs, aside from so very small dents removed from the back of the bow area that are nearly invisible. The original solid sterling silver neck is also in excellent condition, and has not been damaged or pulled down. It has the matching serial number, as you can see, and it even has some of the original gold lacquer remaining on it! This sax was overhauled before I got it, and it plays well on the current overhaul.

    The main reason to get a King Super 20 tenor saxophone is the tone. These late 40’s Super 20 tenors are big and bold and projecting while still being medium dark and very saturated and punchy. If you put on a brighter mouthpiece, like the classic Berg Larsen / King Super 20 pairing, then you get a killing sort of dark/fat/bright/projecting sound that you can’t get on any other saxophone. It’s the reason why there is such a thriving community of King Super 20 players even 70 years after horns like this one were manufactured. It’s my favorite tenor as well, out of everything that I have played.

    If you’re looking for a very good professional tenor to play and enjoy that won’t back down no matter what you throw at it, that will cut through a band with ease, even without amplification, and that has the beauty of the pearls, engraving, and silver neck, then by all means, get this one. I try to keep a good selection of King Super 20 tenors around, so check them out, and email me with any questions. If you want to pair it with a new case, I can get you a great deal on a BAM that will fit it well. Just for fun, here’s a clip of Charlie Ventura playing his ’48 King Super 20 tenor. And I suspect, but cannot prove, that Sonny Rollins played Saxophone Colossus on a Super 20 much like this! 

    Only one available!

     

  • Martin The Martin Alto Original Saxophone 179447

    $ 1,750

    Priced to sell!

    Freshly overhauled The Martin Alto which plays GREAT. Feels effortlessly big and loud and powerful, with a medium dark tone that brightens up nicely with a higher baffle mouthpiece. You can do anything on these altos. This was original lacquer which is mostly worn off and it still looks great. This horn was played a fair amount before being overhauled, so it has had some small dents removed. The thumb hook has been replaced also. (Original thumb hooks frequently fall off of Martins, for whatever reason.) If you’ve been looking for a super-fun alto that looks cool and sounds different from anything else out there today, this would be a great choice. With the fresh, complete overhaul, it won’t need any significant repair work for a long long time.

  • Martin The Martin Alto Saxophone Committee III 160564 Relacquered Fresh Overhaul!

    $ 1,100

    Recent complete overhaul done on this The Martin Alto. The lacquer is obviously mottled and not so pretty, but nothing sounds as good for the money as the Committee III. These horns were built to last, and came with 50 year warranty when new!!!

     

  • Martin The Martin Alto Saxophone Excellent Condition! Great Deal

    $ 999

    Here’s a beautiful The Martin Alto that has no dents, no dings, and no past repairs. It looks like it has some original pads still intact also. The patent stick is still on the body tube, and the horn is ready to get an overhaul and play really well. I’m pricing it low, as if it were a relacquer, because the lacquer is over the engraving. The engraving is very sharp though, so this may be a case of the factory engraving first, then lacquering, as the rest of it looks clean and original. So you save several hundred dollars on it for that reason, but for all intents and purposes, playing wise, it’s in beautiful shape and will be a real gem with a good overhaul.

    Martins have among the thickest brass of any saxophone, and they are built like tanks. The whole horn feels solid and sturdy, and it was built to last! It’s the only saxophone I know of that came with a 50 year warranty from the factory! Pretty crazy! The Deco design unity of this horn’s keywork and braces is delightful. From any angle, it’s a coherent object – thought through from the cork through to the bell flare.

    The Martin Alto’s (Committee III) are among the best saxophones for the money that you can possibly get. Quality per dollar spent is hard to beat. This is one beautiful example, and it’s priced to sell.

    Only one available!

  • Selmer Mark VI Alto 1958 Conservatory Model Original Silver Plate 77632

    $ 7,950

    This is an amazingly awesome vintage Selmer Mark VI alto saxophone from 1958 that features all of the possible extra keywork offered by Selmer at the time. This is called a ‘conservatory model’ historically, and has the high F#, G# trill key, forked Eb, and high E trill key all included on the same instrument! You can rock your Ferling studies at presto on this baby. It’s also very rare and super collectible.

    The finish is, of course, original silver plate. We could get the plating touched up only where it is worn if you want to get this beautiful instrument looking nearly new again. But it looks stunning in any case. The pads are sealing well as I got it, and I’ll spend some money on a thorough setup before selling it, or if you want, I can knock a little off the price instead. Either way, it plays quite well now! The price includes the vintage Selmer case with crushed velvet interior as well as a BAM Softpack contoured alto case for safer shipping and easier gigging. You get both!

    Only one available!

  • Selmer Mark VI Tenor Saxophone 1959 Great Player! Original Lacquer 79919

    $ 11,450

    This is one of the most desirable versions of the Selmer Mark VI Tenor ever made. Original lacquer, American-engraved from 1959. The original neck has the matching serial number, and the neck is EXTREMELY nice shape. Usually original necks don’t look quite this good. My personal (favorite of all time) VI tenor is 81k serial, and this is 79919, so they were made only a few months apart, and play virtually identically. The tone is dark, centered, and rich, and brightens up and gets a bit of an edge to it when pushed. Not as bright and projecting as an 87xxx for example, and the extra focus and complexity of the tone gives it a special beauty. It’s very free blowing and responsive. This tenor had a dent removed from the back of the body tube that was basically right behind the spatula keys, near the bell/body brace. You can still see some evidence of it having been removed, but it was removed so well (by Aaron Barnard) that it is almost not there anymore. Besides that, you have a few small dents removed here and there – a couple removed from the bow area (front and back), very small one or two on the bell flare, and one under the D palm key. Just normal stuff for a 60 year-old horn that has been played professionally.

    Repair wise, this tenor received a fresh overhaul a few years ago, done by David Saull (Denver, CO) who works on tons of pro horns in that area and has an excellent reputation. It feels great under the fingers with a nice, snappy, ‘dry’ pad feel and very even action. Tunes well, altissimo is easy, low notes are easy. Just what you’d hope for from an excellent VI.

    It comes in a brand new BAM case. It’s in a Softpack in the photos, which is one of my favorites for an all-around BAM tenor case, as it has some storage under the horn, and a separate place for the neck, but it is nice and small and light to pack around. Comes with backpack straps as well. You can swap this out towards another case if you want a different BAM or something else. Happy to make it work for you. 2% discount with a low-fee payment method (bank transfer, transferwise, check, venmo etc.).

    Priced to sell. You don’t normally see a 1959 in the 80k serial range selling for this kind of price. Could be much higher, but it’s on consignment, and the owner wants it to move quickly.

    Only one available!

  • SML Rev D Alto Saxophone Silver 11584-3

    SML Rev D (=Gold Medal 1) Alto Saxophone Original Silver Plate Old Pads Beautiful 11584

    $ 1,750

    SML, short for Strasser-Marigaux-LeMaire, is probably the best known small French maker of saxophones.  They produced high quality instruments with a unique blend of features that ended up in what I like to think of as a perfect blend of Selmer and Conn- a very French tone, but big like a Conn.  

    The SML “Revision D”, which was not an official name but rather one given by collectors to the model run with this particular set of features, is a professional handcrafted French saxophone whose features include rolled toneholes, a switchable automatic G#/C#, double sprung octave mechanism (which is an excellent feature preventing slow octave changes and should be standard on all saxophones), a 4 slot neck tenon receiver (again, an excellent feature that should be made standard, this time one that applies pressure more evenly around the neck tenon for a more secure fit less likely to develop leaks), and adjustment screws on the upper and lower stacks.  In fact, the Revision D is very much like the model that came after called the Gold Medal, and shares the same bore. The only features that the Gold Medal has that this horn doesn’t are the rocking octave thumbrest (which isn’t actually so great and is often times disabled at the request of the player) and the adjustable felt bumpers for the low notes, which while nice is not a game changer in any way.

    This particular horn is in very good aesthetic shape, and currently wears old pads and will need an overhaul although it does play a little bit as-is.  The original silver plating is in very good condition and seems to be almost unworn, and the neck shows no sign of past damage or repair work. There is some evidence of past dentwork around the lower stack F# and G# toneholes, which were both unfortunately filed a bit for levelness at the time the dentwork was done, I am guessing.  However the filing does not go through the roll, and should not impact playability or repairability, and the dentwork is not noticeable until you get close. If it weren’t for that, this would be a nearly pristine SML, and this flaw serves mostly to bring down the price without having much of a real-world effect on ownership.

    These SMLs have a fantastic sound, unique in their blend of refined yet powerful, and possess excellent craftsmanship.  Not very many were made- about 15,000 total of all sizes of the horns considered to be their best- and they hold up very well over time.