Yamaha

Showing all 17 results

  • Yamaha Custom YTS-82ZII Professional Tenor Mint D79560

    $ 4,500

    This is a fantastic Yamaha 82ZII Tenor in mint condition. Just got a GetASax new horn checkup and is playing its best!

     

     

     

  • Yamaha Purple Logo Soprano Old Pads Great Deal! 10884

    $ 3,000
  • Sold Out

    Yamaha SILVER YSS-82ZRS Soprano Saxophone Mint Condition Setup Excellent

    $ 4,900

    This is a mint condition Yamaha YSS-82ZRS soprano. The Yamaha 82ZRS is basically a reissue of the popular Yamaha 62 soprano. The silver versions were the most desirable of the Yamaha YSS-62R on which the 82ZR is based. So if you have always wanted to get a Yamaha YSS-62RS this is nearly identical, but with some upgraded keywork. The main changes are that the left hand pinky (spatula) keys are now easier to operate and the palm keys are a little more comfortable. Yamaha tells me that the bore and dimensions of the 82ZR are exactly the same as the 62R, and on purpose. It is meant to be a modern reissue of the enormously popular 62R. With the 62R, Yamaha finally broke with the Selmer Mark VI soprano tonal concept and do something warmer, rounder, and more pleasant. It became an instant classic. There’s a big demand for more of these, so Yamaha helpfully rose to the occasion.

    The reason that the 62R/82ZR is so popular is the combination of one piece design – no neck joint to lose air or resonance – and the warm, complex tone that these horns get. And the bent neck, which brings the horn down onto the neck strap for added comfort. Branford Marsalis plays this model, and sounds wonderful on it. I think he helped with the keywork improvements also. In short, it’s probably the best modern soprano available: Lightest, most resonant, very in tune, most comfortable to play, best long term investment. It’s a modern classic.

    If like me, you have always wanted one of these horns in silver, now is your chance. They are hard to find! This one just got its checkup and is ready to go! It is in basically mint condition, but has been played maybe a couple of hours total.

  • Yamaha YAS-23 Alto Fresh Full Overhaul – Best First Alto Excellent Condition 378879

    $ 1,450

    Who spends $1000 to overhaul a YAS-23 and sells it for a $50 profit? GetASax, that’s who.

    Almost every good saxophonist I know started off playing a YAS-23. There’s something about the way these horns are designed and put together that just makes them PLAY. If you ever get a chance to play an overhauled 23 alto, don’t turn up your nose. They are great horns. Lively, projecting, in tune, comfortable under the fingers and built like a tank but without being heavy. No wonder they’re the horn everyone recommends to students. Trouble is, most 23’s have 20-35 year old pads at this point, and they need an overhaul. Unlike nearly any other student saxophone ever made, the 23 actually deserves and warrants an overhaul. So if you want the best, for $1000 less than a new YAS-26 (which, frankly, is a silly price for 26 but whatever), then get this! I try to keep one or two around at any given time. Pair this with a GS New York for a great jazz tone. Pair it with the upcoming GS Hyperion (Brilhart Tonalin Great Neck alto copy) and you’ll have a beautiful cool jazz / do-it-all alto tone.

     

  • Yamaha YAS-23 Alto Fresh Full Overhaul – Best First Alto Good Condition 224085

    $ 1,150

  • Yamaha YAS-62 Alto 36702 Plays Great

    $ 2,750

    This is a beautiful Yamaha YAS-62 professional alto saxophone that also happens to cost only a little more than a new YAS-26 student saxophone. It really shows how good an idea it is to buy a used pro horn, compared to a new student level saxophone. This 62 just got out of the repair shop and had a full checkup with a few pads replaced and everything adjusted. It is in very good condition with only minor wear from use, and it will be an excellent saxophone to own and play and enjoy, that will also hold its value well if you ever want to sell it. The 62 has been the standard saxophone that teachers recommend that you get, for a good reason.

  • Sold Out

    Yamaha YAS-62III Alto Saxophone Brand New with Warranty!

    The YAS-62III Alto saxophone from Yamaha is the go-to, top recommended first professional alto saxophone from most teachers and band directors I have talked to over the years. Again and again online, someone asks something like, “We want to get our daughter/son a good saxophone. Our budget is around $3000. What should we get?” The most common answer is basically always a Yamaha YAS-62III alto. Why? It just works. It’s a professional horn that is extremely reliable and made in Japan, with excellent build quality, great intonation, and a top quality factory setup. You can use virtually any mouthpiece on it, and it will still tune well. That lets you take the (admittedly rather vanilla) tone in myriad directions. Yamaha is a conservative company, and their crowd pleaser YAS-62III alto saxophone is meant to get the job done without over-determining the tone.  It’s clear, medium bright, and round. Not too loud and in your face, not very dark or too bright. Works for classical or jazz.

    It’s hard to keep these horns in stock, as Yamaha has been backordered on them for a long time. I have one available late September, 2022. These come with a new horn checkup before they go to you, meaning my (experienced/skilled/picky) repairman makes sure that the horn plays like it should. Often there are 2 or three little tweaks that take the horn from good to great, and that’s actually a big added value to you to have us do that before you get it. Most of the differerces between new horns of the same model at a store are due to the lack of a good new horn checkup.

  • Yamaha YBS-61 Baritone Low A Original Lacquer Great Deal! 7578

    $ 4,250

    Great deal on an original lacquer professional low A baritone by Yamaha. This is the YBS-61 from the late 70’s and has the ‘purple logo’ mostly intact on the bell. This horn has older pads and is ready to get a repad or at least a thorough playing condition job done. It has had some dents removed, like from the upper bow, but it’s in quite good shape now with minimal dents or dings, and just lacquer wear from regular use over the years. If you’ve been looking for that elusive fully professional baritone under $4k, this is one. Yamahas are built to last, and they’re also among the easiest baritones to work on, so if you put in the money to restore it, you should have a dependable and great playing bari for a discount price. The 61’s remind me of Yamaha trying to sound like a Selmer Mark VI but with a little clearer tone and a little better intonation. Only one available!

  • Sold Out

    Yamaha YCL-20 Clarinet

    $ 100
  • Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone

    Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone – In stock now!

    $ 799

    November 2022 Inventory Update: Two in stock!

    The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone is a new kind of digital saxophone. It is more like a real saxophone than any digital saxophone that has come before, because it has regular saxophone keywork. So unlike an EWI 4000S, 5000, or a WX5, you don’t have to switch to a different keywork feel in order to play the digital saxophone anymore.

    This is going to be huge for people who want to practice saxophone quietly rather than people who just want a midi or digital interface sax. You can practice with headphones on and not bother your neighbors at all hours. Or play it quietly on one of the 15 volume settings. The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone also works fine as a digital input into whatever sound processing software that you want to use. But it feels more like a regular saxophone under the fingers. I’ve been having fun with digital saxophones ever since the Casio DH-100, and I think like the Casio, this Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone will probably become an instant classic of its genre for the same reason – it feels more like an actual saxophone to play than any similar option.

    In brief (more below) are the main features of the Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone that you might care about:

    1. The Yamaha Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone has a speaker in the brass bell, so that the sound you generate vibrates the instrument’s body tube. As you play louder, you feel more resonance.
    2. The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone has a regular saxophone mouthpiece (basically a repurposed Yamaha 4C soprano piece) and even a ‘reed’ so that it feels like a saxophone in your mouth also. The reed doesn’t vibrate though! You can even swap out the Yamaha mouthpiece for your own mouthpiece, as long as it has a similar bore to a 4C, though this won’t do much to the tone if anything. It might make it feel a little more like ‘home’ to you.
    3. The Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone has an advanced breath sensor that responds instantly to small changes in breath support by changing the tone that you generate. Again, you see the theme – feels a bit more like a saxophone to play.
    4. The sound it generates is actual sound samples taken from real Yamaha saxophones. You can switch among Yamaha soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone tones on your Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone. It’s a pretty good idea, thought it still sounds like a midi sax to me. The bari sax model is actually pretty good though.
    5. There’s an app that lets you further modify and control the tone you get from the Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone. The app is actually quite good! And you can also input the sound from your Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone into Ableton or Garageband or ProTools or whatever you like and modify it there, or even run the output into analog or digital pedals, like in our saxophone looping video here.
    6. Interestingly it’s keyed from high F# down to low A so you can use it as a baritone model! And the tuning is adjustable within 5 hz so you can play with a flat piano or in different temperatures with acoustic instruments whose tuning changes with changing weather etc. Not a bad idea!

    Shortcomings of the YDS-150 are as follows:

    1. It’s a bit awkward changing notes with the digital switches on the keys versus the analog feel of a real sax.
    2. Similarly, starting and stopping notes with breath is different from how you articulate them on a real sax. So playing four quarter notes staccato requires you to learn habits that don’t transfer to sax.
    3. Reed doesn’t vibrate, so it doesn’t really feel like a saxophone to play.
    4. Saxophone sound samples don’t sound all that much like a saxophone. See our A/B comparison video for comparison of a Yamaha custom alto vs the YDS-150 alto sound model.
    5. No vibrato or control of tone with embouchure – breath only.

    I’ll put more Yamaha YDS-150 Digital Saxophone details and some review videos and sound clips in the long description below, so scroll down for the additional info! And for only $799, it’s not bad even just as a tool to get some late night practice time in.

  • Sold Out

    Yamaha YSS-675 Professional Soprano Great Deal! 0381

    $ 2,750

    The Yamaha YSS-675 Professional Soprano Saxophone is one of the best soprano saxophones you can buy for the money without a doubt. It is built just like a Yamaha Custom YSS-875 soprano, and it plays just like one too, but it costs less. I have never quite understood why Yamaha made two models that play nearly identically and even look the same and came in the same case with the same necks etc, but that were priced differently. In any case, the result is that you can get a pro soprano for a very reasonable price. This one has a mix of pads, some of which are original, and it plays well and easily on them. Like the original 875, this is the darkest sounding Yamaha that was ever made. The current 875EX is a lot brighter than this. The intonation is excellent, and the dark tone pairs really well with soprano voice, and darkens down some brighter soprano pieces beautifully. Whether you’re wanting to play in a classical sax quartet or play smooth jazz on stage, or anything in between, this YSS-675 does it quite well. I like it with a hard rubber Yanagisawa mouthpiece in around a 5 tip. If you’re starting to play soprano for the first time, get a 4 tip, and you will find it easier than you may have expected to get a good sound on this. I rarely have a nicer soprano like this in the under $3000 price range so someone should definitely grab this!

    Only one available!

     

     

  • Yamaha YSS-82ZRS Custom One Piece Bent Neck Silver Plated Soprano Mint!

    $ 5,100

    Mint, like new YSS-82ZRS soprano that plays absolutely perfectly! These will be collectible some day, because they are sold in small numbers and are the most desirable version. I always have to wait 6 months when I want to order one new. They’re made to order, and will hold their value well over time. If you want the resonance of a one piece soprano with the comfort of the bent neck, so that it hangs correctly on the strap hook, then 82ZR is for you! It plays almost exactly like a 62R, but it costs less. It’s hard to beat in the soprano category.

  • Sold Out

    Yamaha YTS-23 Tenor Very Good Condition Plays Great!

  • Sold Out

    Yamaha YTS-62III Professional Tenor Saxophone Brand NEW with Warranty and Pro Setup

    $ 3,798

    The YTS-62III Tenor saxophone from Yamaha is the go-to, top recommended first professional tenor from most teachers and band directors I have talked to over the years. Again and again online, someone asks something like, “We want to get our daughter/son a good saxophone. Our budget is around $3750. What should we get?” The most common answer is basically always a Yamaha 62 tenor. Why? It just works. It’s a professional horn that is extremely reliable and made in Japan, with excellent build quality, great intonation, and a top quality factory setup. You can use virtually any mouthpiece on it, and it will still tune well. That lets you take the (admittedly rather vanilla) tone in myriad directions. Yamaha is a conservative company, and their crowd pleaser YTS-62III tenor saxophone is meant to get the job done without over-determining the tone. It’s clear, medium bright, and round. Not too loud and in your face, not very dark or too bright. Not very smoky or complex. But you can add most of that back in with a well-chosen mouthpiece.

    It’s hard to keep these horns in stock, as Yamaha has been backordered on them for a long time. I have some more coming in pretty soon (Maybe June 2022) These come with a new horn checkup before they go to you, meaning my (experienced/skilled/picky) repairman makes sure that the horn plays like it should. Often there are 2 or three little tweaks that take the horn from good to great, and that’s actually a big added value to you to have us do that before you get it. Most of the differerces between new horns of the same model at a store are due to the lack of a good new horn checkup.