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  • New York Model alto Meyer Bros Ted Klum

    ‘Meyer Bros.’ New York Model Alto Mouthpiece by Ted Klum – the Best!

    $ 499

    This is an exceptional alto saxophone mouthpiece. It does literally anything you want it to, from lead alto, to ballads, to section work, to pit and concert band. It is what I play, and I can’t recommend it highly enough. Every single person who has bought one has emailed back or called me with rave reviews. I don’t normally make these kinds of pronouncements about mouthpieces, but until you play one of Ted Klum’s facings, it is possible that you don’t yet know how easy it should be to play saxophone. The response is instant; subtone is effortless; altissimo is right there and easy. The tone is just gorgeous – it’s based on the type of Meyer Bros that Cannonball Adderley played, and it really does lean in that full-throated, warm, lyrical direction that you think of with Cannonball. Phil Woods’ tone is another reference point for alto players, and he also played a NY Meyer like this is based on. The big reasons to buy this instead of hunting for a NY Meyer are price and consistency. Meyer Bros NY alto mouthpieces now sell 2-5x the price of this piece. And out of 5 original facing Meyer Bros pieces, you might get 2-3 good ones. Every single one of Ted’s New York Models is consistently great.

    You can get this version with the silver shank band included, or you can get it without the silver band. The band is an aesthetic nod to Cannonball Adderley, whose Meyer Bros had a similar one, and it is also protects the shank from cracking over the years or from a too-large neck cork. It is dry-fit with a ring sizing machine, so you can take it off or put it on without any adhesive. If you have any questions about these mouthpieces, feel free to contact me.

  • ‘Meyer Bros.’ New York Model Alto Mouthpiece by Ted Klum – the Best! (No Shank Band)

    $ 399

    This is an exceptional alto saxophone mouthpiece. It does literally anything you want it to, from lead alto, to ballads, to section work, to pit and concert band. It is what I play, and I can’t recommend it highly enough. Every single person who has bought one has emailed back or called me with rave reviews. I don’t normally make these kinds of pronouncements about mouthpieces, but until you play one of Ted Klum’s facings, it is possible that you don’t yet know how easy it should be to play saxophone. Ted Klum is one of the most highly-skilled and artistic mouthpiece makers in the world, and his work is just about the best that there ever has been. It would be wise to get one of Ted’s mouthpieces before he retires and they suddenly jump up in value.

    How does it play? The response is instant; subtone is effortless; altissimo is right there and easy. The tone is just gorgeous – it’s based on the type of Meyer Bros that Cannonball Adderley played, and it really does lean in that full-throated, warm, lyrical direction that you think of with Cannonball. Phil Woods’ tone is another reference point for alto players, and he also played a NY Meyer like this is based on. The big reasons to buy this instead of hunting for a NY Meyer are price and consistency. Meyer Bros NY alto mouthpieces now sell 2-5x the price of this piece. And out of 5 original facing Meyer Bros pieces, you might get 2-3 good ones. Every single one of Ted’s New York Models is consistently great.

  • BAM Cabine Tenor Sax Case

    $ 391

    This is one of the best tenor cases made today. It’s a 10/10 in terms of protection, padding, latches, reliability, and weight. It’s built to minimize size, so you can carry it into an airplane cabin. Highly Recommended. Fits most horns.

  • Sold Out

    Brilhart Streamline 5 Alto Saxophone Mouthpiece MPC400

    $ 375

    Beautiful almost new example of a rare Streamline Brilhart Ebolin alto mouthpiece. Stamped 3*, it measures like a Meyer 5 tip at .074″ on the original facing. This is often the case with Brilharts, where you only know the tip by measuring.

    This mouthpiece plays great with a beautiful warmth and fullness that also does not lack projection. Brilharts like this are among my favorite vintage alto mouthpieces (along with Meyer and MC Gregory).

    If you happen to want the rare and collectible original Brilhart BB screws streamline alto ligature and cap, I have one in my collection that fits this mouthpiece that I would be open to selling.

  • Sold Out

    Buffet Senzo Alto Excellent Condition Solid Copper Fantastic!

    $ 3,650

    When I got this new, high-end Buffet Senzo solid copper alto saxophone in recently, I had no idea what to expect. I had heard good things, but I also am not used to thinking of Buffet as a pro saxophone maker in recent times. In short, I was extremely impressed!

    I’m a fan of the vintage Buffet saxophones from the 40’s through the 70’s, and I wondered whether this would be like a good S1 alto, for example. It is, and it isn’t. The S1 was fantastic, but the Senzo is a whole different level. It is extremely refined. Where some saxophones make you work to get an interesting tone, the Senzo just produces it without any fuss. This is no ‘clear, bright, generic’ tone like you get on most modern altos. It is centered, with a distinct core that your ear can easily follow. And the copper gives it its own special magic. This is hard to put into words. If you read around on this site, you’ll see that I never make claims about the effect of the outside finish on a saxophone’s tone. By contrast, when you change the base material, of, say, a Yanagisawa alto neck (or a whole horn) among brass, bronze, copper, solid silver (or even plastic!) the effect on the tone is immediate, dependable, and obvious. We don’t really have a vocabulary for these timbral differences, so I’ll do my best. Compared to brass (most saxophones) copper gives you a rich, vibrant, focused sort of projection, and tons of richness both at low and high registers. If brass is Elton John, copper is Freddie Mercury. Silver is noticeably darker, more focused, and has more overtones. Bronze is darker and richer than brass but not as punchy as copper and not nearly as focused and overtone-y as silver. Whew, that was not really satisfactory, but it’s a start towards explaining why it’s worth making a saxophone out of copper at all.

    If you want to play jazz or just have an all around great alto, the Senzo is surprisingly great at that. It tunes well with a Meyer style piece, which cannot be said of the modern Selmer Series II or III altos by contrast. But it also really lends itself beautifully towards classical and ensemble alto playing. It tunes so well, and the timbre blends well, so it just gets the job done. I’m almost talking myself into keeping this horn, so I had better stop.

    The only weirdness of the design is the way the high F# tone hole cuts through the neck tenon area, which means that you can’t move the neck right or left very much. The ergonomics feel like a Selmer or a Yamaha or whatever – modern, easy, and comfortable. This horn is in very good condition, and was just tuned up. The pads are in good shape and haven’t been played that much since it was bought new a few years ago. There was a little ding removed from near the C keyguard that is really hard to see. And there’s a little ‘acid bleed’ in a couple of places, which means just a bit of tarnish under the lacquer near a couple of post feet. All in all, it looks beautiful, and even better in person than in the photos. In case it’s not clear, that pink color is just the copper showing through clear lacquer, and the keys are regular brass. These altos are really exceptional, and I recommend them highly. Plus, it’s priced super low to sell quickly. Some lucky person will get a great deal. Here’s another review by a friend of mine, Paul Harr at The Saxophonist mag. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwIyKeY4WWw

    Only one available!

  • Conn 6M Transitional Art Deco Alto Saxophone 247105 Great Shape 1931

    $ 1,600

    I love Conn altos in the 230-260k range, and especially the ones near 250k serial. This 247k is a transitional Conn between the New Wonder II (‘Chu Berry’) and the 6M (‘Artist’) models. It is a true transitional in every sense, and is almost half NWII and half 6M. These special alto saxophones have a tone and set of features found nowhere else, and that makes them especially great in several ways. The bore still feels more like a NWII to play, so the tone is wider and wilder than the later 6M’s (which are also great, but are more focused and a bit less wild). The neck is like a 6M, so you get the improved intonation that ‘slots in’ better – NWII’s have good intonation as well, but it is more flexible than the 6M versions. The bell keys have moved around to the left, but the left hand spatula keys retain their NWII shape, but with improved mechanics. No saxophone has an easier or more direct feel on the low B and Bb that this version of Conn. It’s nice and light and fast, though you don’t have anything like modern ergonomics on those keys, of course. The regular main stack keywork is already mostly updated to the fast and comfortable 6M design. That is very good keywork, and is hardly improved upon in modern horns, so this is a very comfortable horn to play.

    It came with special ‘art deco’ engraving on the bell that you only see for a short time around 245-249k serial with Conn altos. This example is original or ‘first’ lacquer, and has not been refinished. It has original pads and even comes with the original warranty and care booklet in the original case.

    Tonally, these late transitional 6M’s are an ideal choice for big band or jazz band lead alto. They have almost unlimited projection or ‘carrying power’ as the old advertizements put it. And the tone stays strong and cohesive no matter how much you push it. It’s just a joy to hear one of these in full song. Marhsall Royale and the Basie band all played Conns like this, as did Charlie Parker for a while (among many other horns). You see them commonly in clubs in NYC and all over Europe these days. Nothing sounds like a Conn. This one is priced low for what it is. Superb original condition. Add a good overhaul, and you will have one of the best built alto saxophones ever, that will be dependable and fantastic to own and play for many many years to come. If you like this version in silver, I also have a silver 249k that I just got completely overhauled that is also for sale.

    Only one available!

     

  • Sold Out

    Conn 6m Transitional Art Deco Alto Saxophone 249081 Overhauled!

    $ 3,450

    The Conn 6M transitional takes many forms, and this particular original silver plated example is from 1932.  It features art deco engraving (a style which only appears for a couple of years), left hand bell keys, 6M style keywork everywhere except the left hand pinky table, which is New Wonder II style. This is the last iteration before the transitional becomes nearly identical to the 6M, and to my ears these have a bit wider tone of the New Wonder II than the transitionals just after it- and in fact around this serial range is my favorite of the transitionals, playing-wise.  

    It has just gotten a complete overhaul, and it looks crazy stupid fine! Physically it is in extremely good condition, with no dents or dings or evidence of past repairs that I can see.  The neck is undamaged and shows no signs of past pulldown, and the microtuner is free and functional. The silver plate is thick and unworn, and shined up unbelievably well with a gentle polish! It comes with its original case in good condition and its original warranty card. These are great altos, built by the finest American saxophone craftsmen in their heyday, and a super clean one like this is a great place to start if you are looking for a fantastic vintage horn that will last you a lifetime for less of an overall investment than most any new horn of even middling quality that you can buy today.

  • Conn 6M VIII Original Silver Plate Pre-War Rare Version 285404 Excellent Condition

    $ 2,650

    Incredible Pre-war Conn 6M VIII in silver plate. You rarely see silver plated instruments before WWII stopped conn production in mid 1942. This one from 1938-39 is in gorgeous condition with original silver plate nearly 100%. The pads are older. Plan on a repad. The neck is great condition also with no damage. No past repairs. Interestingly, this appears to have been special ordered with a second strap hook, which makes the horn balance like a modern alto. I have never seen this before on a Conn, but I’m certain that this is factory original, as the plating matches and there is no sign of aftermarket soldering at all. Pretty cool!

    Only one availble!

  • Conn Connstellation Alto Saxophone 28M Excellent Condition Original Lacquer 338006

    $ 2,750

    The Conn 28M will always have a special place in my heart.  It represents the last time one of the great American saxophone manufacturing companies tried something wholly new, and although the horn never really found a market and not many were made, they are fantastic instruments that besides being unique and historically interesting, play *really* well.  

    These saxophones were redesigned, utilizing many ideas from Allen Loomis (Conn’s resident saxophone visionary) and Hugh Loney, with input from Santy Runyon, with the aim of creating a saxophone that had extremely slick keywork and a very balanced scale.  The keywork, although familiar under the fingers with regard to placement and layout, is mechanically quite different from any other saxophone and has been built from the ground up with the goal of reducing mechanical friction. There are no pivot screws anywhere on this saxophone, instead the long rods have a very long hinge rod with the middle machined down so only the ends touch.   The G# has a very unique torsion mechanism to provide a G# feel that is smooth throughout the range. The side keys are designed so that the angle and distance of travel is the same for each key. There are adjustment screws on the upper and lower stacks as well as the left hand pinky table. The bell keys are on the left side, and the pants guard/bell keyguard is a large acrylic plate that was designed with the idea in mind of allowing the horn to vent properly regardless of playing position or clothing choice.  The octave mechanism has three pips (octave vents), one on the neck and two on the body, which has the end result of a very clear middle D and no hiss on the A or G#, as well as excellent intonation. The keywork in general is very light, and the pearls are larger than usual for Conn and a little flatter. The overall feeling is of a very light horn, extremely slick, easy to play, excellent intonation, and very even throughout.

    The one downfall of this design is the pants guard, which is fairly brittle and often broken.  Although nowadays there are excellent replacements available, this one has its original guard is about as good condition as they come, fully present with only a few small cracks radiating from around the screw holes, which is common.  However none of the cracks are large and it is not broken in two or missing any pieces, which is not common! And believe it or not, I have experience shipping these so you can rest easy knowing I will remove it for shipping, wrap it separately, and it will arrive to you in good condition.  

    This instrument plays quite well on older pads, with a strong, moderately bright, cheerful voice.  The clarity of the tone is notable, and it is a lot of fun to play with a unique look and feel and timbre that would lend itself easily to classical, big band, or small group jazz.  The lacquer is original and nearly flawless, with no evidence of past repairs or dents or resolders of any kind. It is also a unique and interesting piece of saxophone history, in exceptional condition, and whoever owns this instrument next will have a lot of fun being its steward for the next generation.  

  • Conn Gold Plate Chu Berry Alto Saxophone Portrait

    Conn New Wonder 1 Alto Original Burnished Gold Plate Portrait 84738

    $ 2,950

    There are a ton of beautiful altos on the site, but this one stands out from the crowd. It is the heaviest gold plate finish that Conn offered – basically sheets of thick (actual) gold rubbed onto the brass to give you a finish that will last for centuries with minimal maintenance required. Both gold and skilled labor were cheap back in 1920’s America and Conn could afford to invest an extra couple of days’ labor in applying all this gold by hand-burnishing, and engraving such an elaborate scene on the saxophone, and still make a profit. These days, it would be literally impossible to reproduce saxophones like this and market them. They would cost far too much. Just a thin layer of modern gold plate costs like $3500 to do.

    So this horn is something very special. Not just as a piece of art, or a piece of exceptional craftsmanship, but as a musical instrument as well. William Morris, the influential artist, famously encouraged us to “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, and believe to be beautiful.” This alto sax just wails as a player, and definitely fits both requirements nearly as well as a saxophone could. The engraving features (probably) Apollo, god of music, with his harp, and an extremely ornate C.G. Conn logo and decoration.

    This alto has very good pads, and plays extremely easily on the current, high-quality overhaul. It feels nice and snappy under the fingers, and the pad work is very good, flat and ‘dry’ feeling, which is a sign of high-quality work with rolled tone holes. The tone is pure 1920’s jazz power: wide, smooth, warm, and dark, but very projecting. This horn vibrates under your fingers even at moderate volumes, and is super fun and responsive to play. Low register is easy. Intonation is good, though you can easily bend notes around also. The keywork is vintage, so it will feel weird if you’re coming from a Yamaha, at least at first. But the tone and beauty you get in exchange makes it well worth it.

    Only one available!

  • Grafton Alto Saxophone Excellent Original Condition Restored and Playable 10591

    $ 4,750

    Ah, the Grafton “plastic” (actually its acrylic) saxophone.  Famously played by Charlie Parker and David Bowie, crafted by an English company, designed by an Italian, it is, according to sales literature of the time, a “tone poem in ivory and gold”.  

    This particular example has actually been repadded by some enterprising repairer (I say it this way because they are notoriously challenging to work on) and it has been done rather well.  It plays, as you may or may not expect, very much like a saxophone and there is not much in the playing of it to convey that the instrument you are playing is wholly unique, with new methods of manufacture and the completely singular keywork mechanisms that its injection molded acrylic body required.  It is comfortable under the fingers, responsive, weighs about what a normal sax weighs, and plays with a warm, if somewhat uncomplex, tone. It is in fact quite an amazing instrument when taken as a whole, and the experience of playing it leaves me with wonder and respect for the company that made it.  

    These are famously known for being delicate, and not many have survived to this day.  This example is in quite good shape, with the only body repair that I can see being the bell to body brace looks to have been shored up with epoxy where a crack was forming.  There are some small hairline cracks near the tenon receiver, but they are minor and do not appear to be spreading. The finish on the keys is original, and the neck is in very good shape with no evidence of past repair or pulldown.  The keyguard is complete and undamaged, and it comes with its original Dallas case.

     

  • Ishimori Wood Stone Alto Saxophone Brand New WSA-VL with F# Dark Lacquer

    $ 4,500

    Last one!

    This is the highly sought-after Ishimori Wood Stone alto saxophone available. The model is WSA-VL with high F#. It has dark, cognac colored lacquer and beautiful hand engraving, the among the most elaborate of any modern saxophone. Effortless player. Hard to emphasize how effortless. Completely effortless low register, low Bb pops out like any other note. Altissimo is easy. Tuning is great. The tone is sort of Selmer-ish but punchier. Easy to play delicately and softly with plenty of saturation and projection. Action is low, fast, and snappy. Great for jazz, concert, ballads– really anything. I’m impressed. $4500 brand new.

  • King Soprano Saxophone Gold Plate Fresh Overhaul Amazing! 99847

    $ 3,600

    Just freshly overhauled!! This got a full restoration, so it’s back to like new mechanical condition.This is the vintage soprano you should get!

    This amazing gold plated King soprano saxophone will blow the walls down. It is in excellent condition, with nearly all the original gold plate intact. It has just received a full overhaul and restoration, which is not a small job on a 90 year old instrument. It is now back in like-new playing condition and ready to make music for many many years to come.

    King sopranos are rare, and were only made in low pitch (regular concert pitch). They tune nicely, and have a big, warm, medium-focused tone that is less polite sounding than a Buescher, and really fills a room with ease. This example in gold plate and in such amazingly good condition is extremely rare. The great depression in 1929 spelled the end of most of the saxophone market, and marked the end of most makers building sopranos in any kind of quantities. So it’s not surprising that you don’t see a King soprano later than this serial. This is one of the very last ones made, and the latest serial I have seen. The later the better is my motto on vintage sopranos generally speaking, so getting a late one also in gold plate is really exceptional.

    Only one available!

  • King Super 20 Alto Full Pearls 1952 Fresh Overhaul 328xxx Outstanding

    $ 5,150

    King altos are the best altos ever, full stop.

    This one has original lacquer and looks good in a played in way, with the only past repair being a resoldered low C key guard. It just got a full, fresh, high-end overhaul, done by the highly-skilled Jan Olsen (Norway). This means it got about 30 hours of painstaking labor done to make the mechanism all factory fresh, and to replace everything that can be replaced so that it is back to new playing condition and pad wise. It now performs great and will be ready to go for many many years to come with only regular maintenance needed.

    This King Super 20 alto is from just about the most desirable year, 1952, which is the same version and serial of Super 20 that Cannonball Adderley played on Kind of Blue and Somethin’ Else. It is in great shape, with no serious past repairs at all.  This is the ‘Series II’ which has the best combination of beauty, features, and key work of all of the Super 20 altos. You really can get the Cannonball Adderley vibe going on one of these (with lots of practice) better than almost anything else. Cannonball played almost exactly this serial alto on Kind of Blue. This plus a Meyer 5 or Ted Klum NY Model plus a soft reed and lots of guts is what you need for what I consider to be the benchmark for good alto sound.

    Why do I say that Super 20’s like this are the best altos ever? The overall combination of tone, beauty, and ergonomics. For me, great tone that you get from these full pearls Super 20’s is pretty hard to beat. It’s warm, full, rich, and projecting, but without any hint of shrillness or thinness. Cannonball’s tone, I always think of as a tenor saxophone reincarnated in the body of an alto, and that’s pretty much what a Super 20 alto like this allows. It feels like the tone is coming from a bigger, deeper instrument, but in the alto register, which is really remarkable. You can of course do a million other things with it. Check Francois Carrier’s music for another take on Super 20 tone (also same serial as this). The Super 20 is going to keep getting more and more desirable, and harder and harder to find. They’re just fantastic, and they are way rarer than Mark VI’s or any other top notch vintage or modern alto.

    This horn is priced to MOVE. Once you figure in the overhaul, it’s absurdly cheap. Particularly for the tone you get. Someone should grab it now and not look back. You never need to ‘upgrade’ from this. If you don’t love it, send it back. I take returns.

    Just for fun, here’s Cannonball on his Series II Super 20 playing one of his classic ballads, Dancin’ in the Dark.

  • King Super 20 Tenor Saxophone 1957 Near Mint Original Lacquer Overhauled!

    $ 5,950

    Holy cow! This is the nicest example of a ’57 King Super 20 that I have had the pleasure of selling. It just got a complete overhaul! It was original pads 63 years old, when I got it, and now it’s totally fresh, clean, and completely restored. It’s awesome!

    The tone of these horns is just to die for. Powerful, resonant, very loud when pushed (it goes to 11). The solid silver double socket neck gives you extra focus, and a dark core with lots of overtones. The horn overall is bright and projecting, but in a way that stays fat, like only American saxophones can. Ideal for either cutting through a band, or playing the most gorgeous ballads, this is one of my favorite saxophonse of all time.

    This tenor has no damage, no dents or dings, and almost all its original lacquer. The solid silver neck even looks odd to King fanatics like me because it still has its original gold lacquer over the silver, which you hardly ever see. There’s some scratching on the back of the body tube from normal use, and a couple of tiny, nearly invisible dings I got removed from the bow, but you’d never notice anyway. It’s as nice as you will ever find. And priced to sell!

    The best demo of a “Series III” Super 20 that I know of can be found here. It’s one of the only cases that I have found where I heard a demo and what I consider the essence of the tone of the horn itself is front and center on display (as opposed to the mouthpiece, the player, or a bunch of other distracting noise. Listen and enjoy! This is the same horn as in the demo, just made a year or two later. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBoeWeRyy-o 

     

  • New Old Stock Yamaha Purple Logo Baritone Saxophone YBS-62 Mint Unbelievable! Overhauled!

    $ 9,000

    Now comes with a full overhaul!! All new pads and the full deal. That’s a huge added value. It plays EFFORTLESSLY and beautifully, with a warm, complex tone. Take it in a funk direction with an aggressive mouthpiece, and it will bark and cut without thinning out. Take it in a classical direction, and it will do a gorgeous cello-like tone better than any other baritone that I know of. Highly recommended!

    This is an amazing chance to get a new old stock Purple Logo YBS-62 baritone saxophone. This sax was originally a display model that Yamaha brought to the USA for a trade show almost 40 years ago. Yamaha sold the instruments from the display, and they sat in someone’s closet for that entire time. This sax came in the plastic in the case, and I had to take it out to take photos. There are maybe a few of the lightest possible surface scratches not through the lacquer, but aside from that, it looks as new as it could be and be from the early 80’s. The tone is beautiful and warm, rich, and medium focused. Intonation is great. Works with just about any mouthpiece. This horn can play the full range from classical to funk no problem and be as reliable as a Lexus day after day, year after year. This is BY FAR the nicest example of a purple logo 62 baritone that I have seen, and the nicest one we are likely to see.

    It has the case keys, the polishing cloth, mouthpiece and ligature, warranty booklet, and even a set of removable wheels that attach to the end of the case so that you can roll it if you want. First time I have seen that. If you want a beautiful baritone to play that is really special, this is it. And at this price, it’s about the same as buying a modern 62, so you don’t even pay a premium to get the new old stock. That’s pretty great.

  • Powell Silver Eagle SE10 Alto One of 18 Made – all options solid silver +Matt Stohrer Overhau

    $ 12,000

    For your viewing pleasure, this is one of the 18 Powell Silver Eagle saxophones made. Powell conceived of an ambitious project to bring back an American-made saxophone of the highest quality. Inspired by the Super 20 SilverSonic, the Silver Eagle reproduces the bore while adding solid silver soldered tone holes and modern keywork. Powell sadly ended their project after making only 18 saxophones, despite high demand, due to the high cost of production. This horn plays like a good super 20 but a little more evenly, and has been completely overhauled by Matt Stohrer. This is the ultimate collectible among modern saxophones, and it is also a burning player. Asking price is just what these cost new, plus a little extra since it got a $1500 overhaul on top of that! It’s not even inflated for the collectibility value, which is probably not smart of me, but there it is. If you want to discuss all the details of this project, I can put you in touch with the people who built it. These were most definitely a new saxophone bore and neck design, inspired by the best King Super 20 SilverSonic altos, both according to them and according to the folks who bought the tooling and mandrels when the project ended. The keywork is modified from tooling bought from B&S, which accounts for the pinky table that sticks out farther than it would on something like a Yamaha.

    There is most certainly only one available. This one has all the possible factory options, which only a subset of Powell Silver Eagles had – including the solid silver tone holes and even cryo treatment. Of the 18 saxophones built, I know at least a couple of them were brass bell, and some others lacked other of these features. This is one of the ones with everything, which makes it even more collectible. Includes the original accessories, case, and paperwork.

    Just for fun, here’s Matt Stohrer’s repairman’s overview from when he overhauled it.

  • Selmer Mark VI Alto MK 6 Original Lacquer for sale

    Selmer Mark VI Alto Saxophone 1969 Original Overhauled Excellent! 165069

    $ 6,750

    This is one of those altos you don’t want to put down. It’s just gotten a complete overhaul / mechanical restoration, which means that it feels and plays like new or even a bit better. I wanted to get this horn overhauled, because I had a really good feeling about how it played even on the original pads that it had when it got here. If you want a VI that will be problem-free for many many years, and plays better than any modern horn on the market, (and will go up in value) this is what you want!

    This was a one-owner horn that was well cared-for for decades before now, and now it is getting a good start on a new life with a top shelf overhaul. This thing has a beautiful voice. Medium between bright and dark, rich, and resonant. The late 60’s Mark VI’s are my favorites for all-around Selmer altos, because they do basically everything well. Intonation is good, scale is even, low notes are saturated even at pianissimo, upper register screams. This has the ‘medium bow’ if you’re wondering about such things, which means the low register tunes the best of the Mark VI’s. You can’t beat a Mark VI alto like this for build quality and all-around satisfying playing experience. You get the beautiful, unbeatable tone of a Mark VI, the comfortable key work, the excellent intonation, and the feel of a new horn under your fingers, and all for less than a (let’s be honest) comparatively poorly made new Selmer alto. Plus this holds its value and appreciates, while your new horn is going to be worth approximately half the new price in about one second after you unbox it (gasp).

    Comes with the original case, and you can add a great BAM case for a big discount if you contact me.

  • Special Order a BAM Case! Lots of options available.

    $ 555

    Let’s find you the perfect case for you! Prices and availability vary.

  • Ted Klum Acoustimax Alto Mouthpiece – (much) Better than a Meyer

    $ 265

    This is a mouthpiece that for the price is very hard to beat. It plays like a vintage Meyer Bros with a lot of punch, and is great for jazz, lead alto, or other sorts of playing where you want a warm, full tone that has a reasonable amount of projection. The quality control on these is very good – worlds better than your modern Meyer made by Babbitt. You can just buy one of these and it will play great, as opposed to buying ten modern Meyers and maybe finding one good one.

  • Ted Klum Tonamax Tenor Mouthpiece Like Florida Otto Link Tone Edge Slant

    $ 600

    Ted Klum’s Tonamax is as close as you can get to a vintage Florida Otto Link “Slant” Tone Edge. It plays big, full, medium-dark with a punchy edge, just like a good Link slant. I think it’s a bit more like the earlier ‘No USA’ slant than like the later brighter USA version. Ted’s new ‘Florida Model’ is more like the later Florida Tone Edge or ‘Early Babbitt’ tenor pieces. This Tonamax is like the earlier Slant. I can get you one in any tip opening, in black ebonite, or sometimes in beautiful marbled ebonite.

  • echobrass echomaster tenor metal mouthpiece ligature

    Tenor Metal Otto Link Brilhart Reproduction 3 Band Ligature Berg Larsen Dukoff!

    $ 165

    Best ligature around for a metal Otto Link (and similar) tenor mouthpiece! Way better than the stock Otto Link metal top screw ligature, this gives you a much firmer hold on the reed, which greatly improves response and reduces movement or reed swelling on the mouthpiece table. The plastic reed plate fits the reed beautifully and opens up plenty of vibration. No deadening fabrics or strings here. Plus, this is made to the highest standards in South Korea by people who care about quality saxophone equipment. It’s a true reproduction down to the materials used, of the most desirable saxophone ligature ever made. This also fits larger body Berg Larsen and vintage Hollywood Dukoff tenor mouthpieces, and all Otto Link Metal-sized tenor mouthpieces, like Ted Klum Focustone Tonamax, Theo Wanne larger body metal, and many others. See the photos. For thin body metal mouthpieces, get the Guardala sized tenor ligature instead.

    If you want the best ligature for a Berg Larsen metal tenor mouthpiece, this is it. If you want the best ligature for a Dukoff Hollywood or Dukoff Stubby tenor piece, again, this is it.

    This ligature fits all metal Otto Link tenor mouthpieces also – past and present. It fits Masterlink, 4****, ToneMaster, Super ToneMaster NY, FL, Early Babbitt, and regular Babbitt-made pieces. The modern variants like the ‘New Vintage’ NY, Millennium edition etc also all fit.

    Buy with confidence. I take returns, and I stand behind this product. It’s the real deal.

  • YSS82ZRSSopranoStockPhotos-3

    Yamaha YSS-82ZRS Soprano Saxophone One Piece Bent Neck Silver Plate! BRAND NEW

    $ 4,750

    Available new by special order anytime. Email me at [email protected] to order. The Yamaha YSS-62R and 62RS are the most desirable vintage sopranos pretty much. Yamaha made an upgraded reissue of this soprano, with improved keywork but the same bore. It’s simply the best.

  • Yanagisawa SC-9930 Curved Soprano Saxophone with High G! Rare

    $ 4,150

    For those of you who love to have the best and rarest at the same time, here is my favorite vintage of curved soprano ever made, the Yanagisawa SC-991, but this is in the solid silver neck and body tube version, which is SC-9930, AND it is one of the rare ones that came with the high G key included. This is the first one like this that I have seen, and it’s cool in a nerdy kind of way to have such a rare and fabulous example. You can order a new SC-9930 for $6730, but your extra $$$ won’t get you the high G! Nor will it be the warmer, fuller-sounding version from the 90’s like this with the bell keys on the left. My personal soprano is one just like this but brass, and I think it sounds better than the right hand bell keys version at least by a little bit. I also like the more direct action that you get with the pinky keys on the left hand bell key configuration. We’re splitting hairs here, but hey, if you’re in the rarified territory of exceptional curved sopranos, then maybe that’s your thing too.

    Condition wise, this SC-9930 is in very good shape, with no significant past repairs or current problems at all. I have not spent any money on pad work yet, as I’m trying to keep the price as low as possible, and the horn plays fine on current pads. I would like to sell it a little higher and spend maybe $250 on a thorough setup, so you can have that as an optional extra if you want.

    Original case and mouthpiece are in good shape as well. There is most certainly only one of these available!